Tag Archives: retro

Vintage Star Wars on the magazine cover

Archvillain Darth Vader, cover of TIME Magazine, May 19, 1980. Artwork by M. Arisman.

As fans around the world prepare themselves for yet another Star Wars feature film that will hopefully delight, thrill and amaze, TVTA digs into the archives to find a selection of old-school Star Wars as seen on the covers of various magazines throughout the late 70s and early 80s.

US. National Doll World. Aug 1984. Contains a feature on the large size action figure range from Kenner.

US. Fine Scale Modeler. Jan / Feb 1986. Model diorama special for Speederbike and Scout.

US. Starlog Covers various.

US. More Starlog various covers.

France. Lecran Fantastique. Return of the Jedi 100 page special. Oct 1983.

Titans. France. 1984. Jean Frisano cover.

France. Pif Gadget. Empire Strikes Back cover and features. 1980.

France. Pif Gadget. Return of the Jedi cover and features. 1983.

UK. Starburst. 1980.

UK. Photo Play. 1983.

US. Starlog 74. 1983.

Thank you for browsing with us!

Cat gifts from Japan #2 – Starlog Jan 1981

Wooof just told me to post up the rest of the goodies from the 1981 Starlog magazine he brought back from Japan – the one with the exceedingly cool free cassette labels that we featured here. So let’s begin with a scan of the front cover followed by some selected pages…

Starlog Japan, January 1981. Also known as Starlog & Future Life. Front cover.

Starlog Japan, January 1981. Contents page.

The theme of this issue was welcoming in the New Year 1981 while saying goodbye to the previous year 1980. This is reflected throughout many of the pages, along with one of Japan’s biggest loves… robots!

Hello Artoo 🙂 Why on the black list? Been upsetting those mean Sith again? Great work droid, keep it up!

 

It’s the same robot that appears on the contents page. I wonder if this is Starlog Japan’s mascot?

I don’t know who or what this cool-looking robot is. There is a Disney copyright printed at the top of the page, so time to head off to the research room! *** EDIT 12/12/17 *** Big thanks to For Tyeth for identifying the robot as Maximilian from The Black Hole.

Advert for Heavy Metal magazine.

The Fiendish Plot of Dr. Fu Manchu

Flash Gordon.

Michael Sullivan. One Point.

Sci-fi and fantasy Books.

Star Wars. Not sure what this is exactly. Some kind of advert for stickers or transfers? The drawings are similar to some Star Wars bootleg collectables I’ve seen like horse racing games. They may be playing cards as they have the suit symbols on them. Help me Japanese readers… you’re my only hope

Thanks for looking   🙂


 

Doctor Who latest ads and the Dalek Supreme!

Vrooop! Vreep! Christmas is coming! And one of the many things the season always brings us is the Doctor Who Christmas special. Trailers for it can be seen here and here. TVTA gets into the festive mood with a selection of vintage Doctor Who ads, and a long overdue toy entry for the Dalek Supreme, from the 2010 Paradigm set released by Character Options.

Finally Daleks Strategist, Scientist, The Eternal, and Drone are no longer leaderless!

The Paradigm featured in the 2010 5th series episode Victory of the Daleks. Writer Mark Gatiss wanted the Daleks to be bigger than those previously seen, with bright colours inspired by the Peter Cushing Doctor Who movies of the 1960s. UK toy license holder Character Options released all five individually throughout 2010.

It’s worth pointing out another interesting Dalek design in the episode Victory of the Daleks, and that is the WWII ‘Ironsides’ employed by Winston Churchill. The Character Options release of this figure is one of my all time favourite Daleks.


And now, in vintage Doctor Who news…

The following ads just in…

US. Starlog. 1984.

UK. Doctor Who Weekly. 1980.

UK. Doctor Who Weekly. 1980.

UK. Starburst. 1989.

UK. Starburst. 1988.

UK. Starburst. 1987.


Thank you for hiding behind the sofa with us 🙂

Non-toy ad Tuesday: music and meetings

Wooof and I just got back from the International Retro Editor & Cat Conference in Oslo. Ha, what a bunch of losers those editors and cats are! Just look at this photo we took –

Oh… wait, what’s that Wooof? You mean that photo is actually us … at the TVTA editorial staff meeting from last November? Wow, we look so strung out. Must get vitamins and haircuts!

So, Wooof, remind me, what is the subject of our latest Non-toy ad Tuesday article?

That’s right, it’s music!

We’ll be looking at French goodies such as a 1983 cover of Rock & BD magazine … a prize competition to put words into James Brown’s mouth! … adverts for the Body Rap, Miles Davis, U2 … and there’s also some Danish treats with Mr Music cassettes, Ga-jol throat lozenges, and a 1969 Disney competition to win a Philips stereo!

Enjoy, while we go get a haircut and straighten out!


France. Rock & BD Associated. 1983.

Polydor and Rigolo magazine prize competition to win James Brown album reissues. Question 2 asks you to imagine the Godfather of soul’s reaction when faced with these magnificent Polydor reissues! France. Rigolo. 1983.

France. Cora. 1988.

France. Rock & BD Associated. 1983.

France. Rock & BD Associated. 1983.

France. Rigolo. 1983.

Denmark. 1988.

Denmark. 1988.

Denmark. 1988.

Denmark. 1969.


See you again soon for another Non-toy ad Tuesday!


 

Cat gifts from Japan – 1981 Starlog sci-fi gals cassette labels!

Wooof just got back from his annual cat holiday in Japan. I asked him to bring me back something vintage and musical. As always, the cat never disappoints! Thanks Wooof, I absolutely love my 1980s sci-fi gals cassette labels! 






The images are printed on cardboard and were given away with Starlog Japan, January 1981. Each image could be cut out and inserted inside a real cassette case to document your sci-fi inspired mix tape! I’m so tempted to make one, as I still have a box of blank cassettes and a cassette recorder … hmm … 



Thank you for rewinding with HB pencils with us 🙂


 

Tammy, the doll you love to dress

Advertised as “The Doll You Love To Dress”, Tammy was a 12″ teenage fashion doll produced by Ideal between 1962 and 1966. Tammy was produced in three versions: a straight legs version, a bendable legs version, and a “Grown Up Tammy” version which also featured an African American version. Tammy inspired the UK’s bestselling teenage doll, Sindy, which was released in 1963, one year after Tammy. Pedigree Toys who owned the license for Sindy obtained permission to use Tammy’s tag line, “The Doll You Love To Dress”.

The selected pages below have been scanned from an early Ideal Toys catalogue. The drawings are quite a charm, and the catalogue includes a checklist of what accessories were available at the time and also a price list.














Thanks for looking!

Siku – quality die cast toys from Germany

Siku’s origins began in the German town of Ludenscheid in 1921. It was founded by Richard Sieper, a toolmaker working in metals and plastics. Early production items included aluminium cutlery, tools, belt buckles, buttons, military badges and decorations. The company went on to became a leader in the field of thermo-plastics, and in 1950 registered the name SIKU – formed from the first two letters of Sieper, and the first two letters of Kunstoff – the German word for synthetic material or plastic. Adapted from: Siku history

Below are scans taken from a German multi-lingual product catalogue showing the 1980 – 1981 range.


Adverts

UK. Eagle. 1983.


Thanks for looking!

Japanese chirashi mini posters: Gremlins, Robocop, Indiana Jones

Some more classic movies added to the TVTA chirashi poster collection. Here are the scans showing both the front and backs.

Gremlins

Gremlins 2

Robocop

Robocop 2

Robocop 3

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

Thanks for looking 🙂

1980s sci-fi and fantasy merchandise

Back in the eighties if you wanted to get your hands on some cool sci-fi and fantasy merchandise you went to your local comic shop or you sent off for mail order via adverts found in comic books and magazines. The following are a selection of adverts found in US Starlog and UK Starburst publications.

Stores and mail order

US. Starlog. 1984.

UK. Starburst. 1982.

UK. Starburst. 1982.

UK. Starburst. 1982.

US. Starlog. 1980.

UK. Starburst. 1989.

US. Starlog. 1980.

Books and publications

UK. Starburst. 1989.

UK. Starburst. 1989.

US. Starlog. 1983.

US. Starlog. 1980.

UK. Starburst. 1989.

Role Playing

US. Starlog. 1985.

US. Starlog. 1985.

Film and video

UK. Starburst. 1989.

UK. Starburst. 1982.

UK. Starburst. 1988.

Halloween countdown: 3

Question: When is the Doctor not the Doctor? Answer: When he’s a werelok!

Part 3 of 5. Introducing a selection of panels and the cover of Doctor Who Weekly, 7th May, 1980, Dogs of Doom by Pat Mills, John Wagner and Dave Gibbons.


1980 advert for the story The Dogs of Doom.

UK. TESB Weekly. 1980.

Thanks for time travelling with us! Look out for Halloween countdown number 2 coming soon…

Halloween countdown: 4

Part 2 of 5. I want my 80s horror!

Greg Hildebrandt poster. Starlog. 1983.

France. Pif Gadget. 1988.

US. Swamp Thing. 1989.

Little Shop of Horrors. Colan and Hunt. 1986.

UK. Starburst. 1987.

Starburst. 1988.

Zeira Urshurak starlog 37 1980

Thanks for 80s doom dancing with us! Look out for countdown number 3 coming soon…

The mystery of the French toy soldier photo collection – SOLVED!

GIF courtesy of theatrenerds.com

Update: 20/10/2017

Thanks to Twitter agent @DanHammond72, I think we can safely say that this mystery is now solved! Scroll down to the bottom of the post to find out the maker of these soldiers!

I recently picked up some paperwork items from a local vintage toy shop here in France. Among the items was a folder of photographs showing a vintage toy soldier collection. The soldiers seem to be Napoleonic era and include both infantry and cavalry. The photos look professionally made and are printed on Kodak paper. This looks like it could have belonged to someone who was documenting and cataloguing their collection. All in all there are about 400-450 pieces across 18 photographs. I’ve spent time online trying to match these figures to brands such as Airfix, Britains, Starlux, Timpo etc, but to no avail. The figures all have the same rectangular bases (similar to Britains) apart from one set which has round bases. If anyone recognises any of the pieces and can put a name to the brand(s) please let me know! Thanks for looking.









Update: 20/10/2017

STARLUX

Here is the comparison I received that makes me certain enough to say that the majority of the figures in the collection of photographs are from the French Starlux l’Empire line. Big thanks to @DanHammond72 for the awesome detective work!

Figurine number 274 (left) with the mint in box picture I received (right). Mystery solved.

I’d already looked through a whole bunch of Starlux images previously and had drawn a blank, so having a match from a mint in box was priceless as it enabled me to make further searches online and find other matches. The figures all appear to be 60 mm in height and datewise appear to span 1965 through to the 80s.

No doubts here. MIB photo from Lulu-Berlu.

 I’m pretty certain the riders here are the same. The MIB photo next to my photo is from Lulu-Berlu. They date the figure as 1965, which leads me to believe that the figure in my photo is possibly a later 80s remould – due to some differences in the horse, most notably the position of the head and colour of base. It could be a switched horse, as online photos of Starlux lots show riders that can be detached. As with many toys that are painted and licensed across the globe, it’s possible that paint applications and mould details may differ. Some collectors add their own paint schemes. This can all lead to many variations. 

No doubts here about the match. MIB photo by Lulu-Berlu.

I was able to match most of the figures in this lot from Paravendu France with figures in my photos.


There. Mystery solved. Or is it? The question that remains now is who did this collection of soldiers belong to? Who was it that took time and care to label and photograph this collection? And why did the photographs end up in a vintage toy shop in Toulon, France? I expect that’s a question that will remain unanswered. For now I’m happy to be able to put a name to it all. Starlux. Thanks for looking, and please feel free to add any further information.