A Translation + Draig Tân + Project #2 update!

Poetry…

I’ve written more of it than I can remember, and have been fortunate to have had some of it published. But I can honestly say I’ve never had a poem translated into another language – until recently.

The images you see are unique artworks by my good friend and collaborator Spira who translated into the Hellenic language the poem part of our 2020 collaboration when we marked the 2500th anniversary of the battles of Thermopylae and Salamis which took place in 480 BC during the Greco-Persian Wars.

The poem is entitled The Breaking of Bread and you can read it in its original English language version here along with its companion sculpture in the Spira/Ford collaboration project #1.

It is an honour and a treat to see my work translated, and for it to be done in such an artistic way is a treasure to behold .


Draig Tân (Welsh Fire)

In 2018 my eldest cousin and I, armed with ancient family photos and documents, and a subscription to a well-known online ancestry site, made some research on our family tree. We already knew about the paternal side – all from England, Birmingham, Peaky Blinders land, ay! But we knew little of the maternal side other than links to Shropshire and Worcestershire, and the intriguing but unproven link that our Great Grandparents came from Wales – thanks to elder family members remembering something about a ‘Welsh connection’.

Well, it came as exciting news when my cousin and I learnt from the documents we supplied that our maternal Great Grandparents and the lines before them came from Powys in Wales. Finally the dots had been joined. Welsh blood ran through us! Get in there you red dragon and up the Manics!

Then… 

Back to Spira, who I told of this news, and who made a sculpture not only in celebration of our collaborations, but with a nifty ‘red dragon’ nod to my new Welshiness.

Draig Tân (Welsh Fire) by Spira.

The sculpture is called Draig Tân (translated to Welsh Fire). Please check the rest of the images here


My thanks to Spira, a Wizard of our age, and the finest person I could wish to collaborate with  😎


The Remains of She

And talking of collaborations… what news of Project #2 coming later this year?

I can tell you that the sculpture parts I’ve seen so far are both haunting and beautiful. Ancient anachronistic awesomeness awaits! I can tell you that the recent writing parts I made are organically pushing me to incredible boundaries and beyond.  

There will be more Welsh fire. Hellenic spells. The Wizard and the Shaman will give precious gifts to the one who will bring renewal to the Earth. Look to the skies. The spring. A resurrection. Friends, in these dark times there will be a light to save us all.

Project #2. The Remains of She. Exclusive extract


The Remains of She. Coming in 2021!

Teaser Trailer #1. The Remains of She – the new Spira/Ford collaboration coming 2021!

The Remains of She.

“A journey to a childhood castle in search of ancient artefacts, healing and renewal; and a love story about to unfold which has travelled across the centuries.”

Announcing: a new art project featuring sculpture by Spira (aka the Wizard) and poem by Ford (aka the Mage) … 2021 will be bringing you the latest collaboration from these two artists.

DoNotEnterDoNotAwake

DoNotEnterDoNotAwake

DoNotEnterDoNotAwake

A wordless “come in”. A blast of barely warm air from his cheap electric fire. She. She pulls down her mask and smiles, and he, he stutters, You… you haven’t changed a bit. She says, You… you look like shit. I’ve seen better days, he says, but now… I don’t have much time.

She says, So let’s hurry along, do you have the key? And he, though enchanted by the shanty of her azure blue eyes, turns away to a desk missing several handles, its rosewood top tattooed with time and the ringlets from tea cups, and he plucks an iron key from a stack of biros in a plastic desk tidy. And he says, The key to the castle?

She says, Yes, we should go there now. And he blinks a sole pale and blue eye and asks, Will we find treasure? She is already turning to the door when she answers, Every castle that ever was, and is, contains a treasure. 

DoNotEnterDoNotAwake

        DoNotEnterDoNotAwake

                DoNotEnterDoNotAwake


The Remains of She

Coming 2021


 

Αεί Έλλην Μαχόμενος ( SPIRA – FORD P WAIGHT collaboration )

Friends, I am so happy to present via the blog of my good friend and collaboration partner – Spira – the fruits of our artistic endeavour to mark the 2500th anniversary of the battles for freedom at Thermopylae and Salamis which took place in 480 BC. Please add your thoughts and feelings over at Spira’s place, and join us in this celebration of one of the greatest gifts we can enjoy – freedom.

inSPIRAtion

This year marks the 2500 years anniversary from the battles of Thermopylae (August ) & Salamis (late September) in 480 BC during the Hellenic – Persian wars.

I am truly excited to honor the occasion with a collaboration with my good friend
                                                         Ford P.  Waight.

View original post 1,051 more words

Coming this weekend: a SPIRA-TVTA collaboration honouring the 480 BC battles of Thermopylae and Salamis

Greek hoplite and Persian warrior depicted fighting. Ancient kylix, 5th century BC.

An introduction to a virtual collaboration

My good WP blogging friend Spira invited me earlier in the year to join an art collaboration to mark the 2500th anniversary of the battles of Thermopylae and Salamis which took place in 480 BC during the Greco-Persian Wars.

The collaboration will consist of sculpture (by Spira) and poetry (by me).

Why?

The battles of Thermopylae and Salamis are regarded by many historians and scholars as two vital armed conflicts which not only saved Greece and shaped the advancement of its democracy, political and social systems – but helped shape the development of Western civilisation. Both ancient and modern writers point to the two battles as an example of courage shown by a nation defending itself against a powerful invader and overwhelming odds.

DVD edition of Zack Snyder’s 300. TVTA.

In popular culture, many will be aware of the battles of Thermopylae and Salamis thanks to the 1962 film The 300 Spartans; and Frank Miller’s graphic novel 300. The novel was given an operatic and stylistic film adaptation in 2007 with Zack Snyder’s 300, and a 2014 sequel 300: Rise of an Empire.

French and Japanese movie posters for 300, and 300: Rise of an Empire. TVTA.

The Battles

Thermopylae

Leonidas at Thermopylae, by Jacques-Louis David, 1814. Image by © The Gallery Collection/Corbis

19th-century painting by John Steeple Davis, depicting combat during the battle.

In the battle of Thermopylae, the outnumbered alliance of Greek city-states led by King Leonidas of Sparta lost to the invading Persian forces led by King Xerxes I. Although a defeat, the battle is referenced as an example of resistance and courage against an overwhelming force.

The site of the battle today. Mount Kallidromon on the left, and the wide coastal plain formed by accretion of fluvial deposits over the centuries; the road to the right approximates the 480 BC shoreline.

Salamis

A romantic style painting of the battle of Salamis by artist Wilhelm von Kaulbach. Image: public domain.

In the naval battle of Salamis, the outnumbered alliance of Greek city-states led by Athenian politician and general Themistocles resulted in a decisive Greek victory against the fleet of Xerxes. The victory marked a crucial turning point in the course of the Greco-Persian wars, leading to the abandonment of the invasion of Greek lands by Persian forces.

Monument for the Battle of Salamis, Kynosoura peninsula, Salamis Island, Greece, by sculptor Achilleas Vasileiou

The poem:

Will not celebrate war – rather freedom from it. By looking back on history we have valuable learning opportunities to build bridges, communication, respect, friendship and peace. The young poet and protagonist of the poem is an idealist and advocate for peace, yet he is also a realist who will defend his land if the hand of friendship is attacked.

The sculpture:

Created by Spira a Greek artist with a passion for reimagining found natural objects into artworks invoking ideas of nature and spirituality, and exploring the boundaries of consciousness.

I will reblog Spira’s post this weekend – when you can see the fruits of our ‘virtual collaboration’ which has crossed the waters between Greece and France to honour a moment in history when the freedom of a nation was at stake. Indeed, perhaps without those battles 2500 years ago, we may not today be in a position to exercise the pleasure and freedom of such a simple thing as artistic collaboration.

Watch this space this weekend!

Ford, TVTA

Street art – a Sunday morning walk through an old town in Provence

When the Ice Melts, the Polar Bear is Grumpy. By Jean-Marc Navello.

This Sunday morn, I was making my way to get a baguette and croissants in a part of town I seldom travel, when I came across this polar bear and other street art to make you stop and stare. In truth, I’d seen this the week before, but didn’t have my camera on me. This morning I did 🙂

Below: also by Jean-Marc Navello.


Below: The Kid… (artist unknown)


Below: the town mural. Many French towns and villages have huge murals like this one painted on a side of a building. This scene depicts the town in older and more rural days.


Magic!

Then there is the local primary school… and a huge, magnificent fantasy scene based on the town in magical days before us humans went trudging about early in the morn in search of a baguette and croissants…


The artist: Loïko


Le Rocher of La Garde. The 11th century castle and chapel depicted from alternative views…

Le Rocher. La Garde. photo par TVTA.


Below: perpetuating the myth of certain creatures which inhabit the New York sewer system (and we’re not talking about Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles).


Woof! (not Wooof)


Meow! (not Wooof)


And finally, a retro poster found about town… and another polar bear to end a post which began with a polar bear.

If you would like to learn more about polar bears, then check out TVTA’s polar-bear-in-a-fridge!!!

For now, that’s all folks. Thanks for taking an early morning stroll with us 🙂

In praise of trees

“Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come.”

Chinese Proverb

The How and Why Wonder Book of Trees. Written by Geoffrey Coe. Illustrated by Cynthia Iliff Koehler and Alvin Koehler. Grosset and Dunlap. New York. 1973.

This was one of the books included in my recent free lot of novels, and is not a novel but The How and Why Wonder Book of Trees, originally published in 1964. My copy is from 1973, and I’m featuring selected images illustrated by Cynthia Iliff Koehler and Alvin Koelher.

Enjoy 🌲🌳🍀🍂🍃🌿🌱🌱🌱

Continue reading

More random book cover designs, and a spotlight on British Salvationist illustrator Jim Moss

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. 1999 Harper Collins. Cover by J.R.R. Tolkien.

We have you covered… again!  (See part one here)

Today’s book post features design covers and illustrations published between the 1920s and 2010s, courtesy of a generous donation of old books to TVTA!

What happened was this… an English teacher working in France was moving home and job, and before leaving she decided to give away a number of her old books. Finally, after a Pandemic-lockdown-observed-meeting outside the local park gates, two bags of wonderful books were handed over for the reading and scanning pleasure of those inside TVTA Towers – cue happiness 🙂

Some of the titles will be instantly recognisable, others obscure, some have been adapted for stage, film or television, but all are equal here in having interesting covers to bind their tales.

Enjoy your donated book!

1920 William Heinemann.

Continue reading

MOTHERS NOT HAPPY

Powerful. Bleak. Tragic.
Please check out more environmental art at fellow WP blogger crowcries

crowcries

20200107_223317

View original post