The art of children’s storybooks and vinyl records, 1960s -1980s

Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca art for Anne Sylvestre – “Fabulettes” 1969.

The storybook and vinyl record was an opportunity for children to fully immerse themselves in their favourite fairy tale, nursery ryhme, song or film. As Disney proclaimed: children can “see the pictures” “hear the record” and “read the book”. Disney Records and its Buena Vista label, along with Peter Pan Records and its derivative Power Records, were among the first companies to explore this multi-media approach to entertaining children by releasing storybooks with a vinyl record. Later would come cassettes – adding a new dimension of ‘mobility’ to the experience, when children could listen on a Walkman and be free to move from room to room or even go outside.

In today’s post we take a look at some French storybooks and vinyl records aimed at the younger children’s market, featuring fairy tales, nursery rhymes and traditional songs. Especially, we take the opportunity to look at some of the artwork involved, and here we see wonderful illustrations from the likes of Biosca, Denise Chabot, Agathe Tran Quang My, Annette Moch and JP Huster who each contributed delightful art for many record sleeves and booklets aimed at children throughout 1960s and 1980s France.


The art of Denise Chabot from “Rondes Enfantines” storybook and record 


The art of Annette Moch and JP Huster – “Fabulettes” 1964.

Anne Silvestre. “FABULETTES”. Dessins par Annette Moch and JP Huster. 1964.


The art of Biosca – “Fabulettes en Couleurs” and “L’école”

Anne Sylvestre “FABULETTES EN COULEURS”. Dessins par Biosca. 1983.

Anne Sylvestre “FABULETTES EN COULEURS”. Dessins par Biosca. 1983.

Anne Silvestre “L’ECOLE” Dessins par Biosca.

Anne Silvestre “L’ECOLE”. Dessins par Biosca.


The art of Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca – “Fabulettes” 1969

Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca art for Anne Sylvestre – “Fabulettes” 1969.

Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca art for Anne Sylvestre – “Fabulettes” 1969.

Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca art for Anne Sylvestre – “Fabulettes” 1969.

Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca art for Anne Sylvestre – “Fabulettes” 1969.


Walt Disney storybooks and records

Walt Disney Jungle Book. Storybook and record. 1983. France.

Waly Disney The Fox and the Hound. Storybook and record. 1983.

Walt Disney The Three Little Pigs. Storybook and record. 1968. France.


Little Red Ridng Hood

Little Red Riding Hood story and record with colouring pages. Le Petit Chaperon Rouge. Disque à Colorier. Artist and date unknown.


Thank you for “seeing, hearing and reading” with us 🙂

The gift of the cat … Chet Phillips Vintage Travel Posters!

The editor and office cat of TVTA in rare moment of relaxation.

How lovely! Yesterday morning in the TVTA mail room, while opening envelopes containing our usual assortment of comics, catalogues, adverts and, erm, bills, I managed to find a surprise gift just for little old me!

Wow, thanks Wooof! I can’t believe you ordered me a set of Chet Phillips Vintage-style Travel Poster Postcards!

Chet Phillips is a digital artist, and you can check out his work here

In the meantime, feast your peepers on the the cool pressie Wooof got me – six vintage-style British and Scottish Tourism posters, upon which not just a splendid tour of Britain is promised, but something else lurking in the scenery!

Enjoy 🙂


As always, thanks for looking 🙂 Thanks Chet for making some wonderful art! And thanks Wooof for the cool gift 🙂

The Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture Kit

Probably my new favourite print advert!

As regular readers know I’m a bit of a fan of Halloween, and I was going to save this beauty for the Big Day… however, the advert is simply too cool not to share right now!

Enjoy 🙂

The Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture Kit

Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture. 1976 print advert. US.

Endorsed by horror legend Vincent Price (I love the line: ‘Look for Vincent Price’s pretty face on the cover’), the Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture was a kit enablng you to decorate and bake apples in the form of nightmarish shrunken heads! Accessories included a baking capsule (The Shrinker) which you heated using a 40 watt common household light bulb , hair, beads, templates for carving facial features, cord, a paint brush, and a carving tool.

The artwork for my 1976 print advert was created by Mort Drucker, a long time contributor to Mad Magazine. The Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture was produced by Crafts By Whiting, a Milton Bradley Company.

Detail from 1976 Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture print advert.


TVTA bonus trivia!

As well as the Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture Kit, Vincent Price was hired by Milton Bradley to appear in advertising campaigns for two of their other popular products: the games Hangman and Stay Alive.

That’s all for now, vintage mates. Thank you for shrinking fruit with us 🙂

Le Ciné c’est Chouette! (cinema is cool)

Le Ciné C’est Chouette ! “Salut les Héros” by Jean Solé. 1985. Pif Gadget. France.


Below images courtesy of Wikipedia The Kid (1921 film)


 

An interesting lot…

We certainly thought so. Presenting a mix of international advertising and graphic art, 1980 to 2017.


Greek telephone cards, 2000

Swift Wind, Princess Power, 1986

Disneyland Paris ticket, 2015

Black Sabbath autographs

Leaflet cover for Dali Exhibition Paris, 2017

1980s mailing sleeve, Netherlands. Featuring Master of the Universe, My Little Pony and Zoids

Groquik, Pif Gadget, France,1986

The universe of marbles, Pif Gadget, France, 1986

Unknown Japanese newspaper print ads

Warren Movie Magazines: Moonraker, The Lord of the Rings, Alien, Meteor, US, 1980

Homemade 3D Ghosts scan

TVTA Ghosts

Postcards from Stella

stellamarss.com

stellamarss.com


thanks for getting interesting with us 🙂

Thanks to Philip Ayres for identifying the Zoids toy in the mailing sleeve as the Spine-Back (AKA Gator in Japan).

Are you feline lucky?

Good afternoon vintage mates. Do you think black cats are lucky or unlucky? Check out some cool vintage black cats by Wibi Wonders and enjoy. I reckon they’re perfect for good luck, for Halloween, and office cats called Wooof approve of them too 🙂

Wibi Wonders

Excuse the pun – I couldn’t resist! There’s not only the international ‘Black Cat Appreciation Day’ (always in August) but also a ‘National Black Cat Day’ here in the UK (always in October). Why?According to the Cat Protection Society, it takes a week longer for black cats to be housed than other cats. One of the myths that could possibly explain why this is, is that black cats are ‘unlucky’. Well, at least at the beginning of the 20th century people thought exactly the opposite. How else can I explain the plethora of Christmas & New Year cards that show black cats bringing or wishing ‘Good luck’? Time for the images to speak for themselves:

W&K Cheerio - wherever you go Publishers: Wildt & Kray  (1903-1915)

may good luck await you - Premier Publishers: Premier

Happy Days - British Manufacture Publishers: unknown

Basket full of luck - publisher unknown Publishers: unknown

Black cats are lucky

Jolly - publisher unknown Publishers: unknown

Here’s a fundraising card:

The Modern Press - ClaytonBack of Lucky Black Cat Perfume Card

I hope I’ve shown that a black cat is nothing to have nightmares about. I will leave you…

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19th and 20th century lithographs + angels, art and advertising

American Crescent Cycles par Winthrop Ramsdell 1899

La Tournée du Chat Noir par Thoéphile Steinlen. 1896. Tin plate.


Cats That Come Back. At a poster store in Montmartre you spent your final few euros on cards depicting the lithographic advertising styles of the late 19th and early 20th century. You took photos of the outside of the poster store, and had one taken of yourself and your youngest son, a part of you indulging in some late-afternoon fantasy that you were the proprietors of said store. What fun, surrounded by art originally intended to part one from one’s cash – and a hundred years later it’s still doing the same, only selling itself this time around. What a sale, what a fine boutique did those Parisian streets make for you. For it’s easy to get lost in the culture, art and spirit of expression when it surrounds you in all its breath-taking vibrancy. There is a deep yearning. A searching back through history to find a part of yourself you may recognise. Print advertising is consumerism’s cocky high art. A brassy exhibition of wonders. A sly yet alluring gallery that invites you inside. It’s everything you love and loathe in the same moment. You pitch these paper testimonials to commercialism with all the integrity and enthusiasm of a loving archivist. But you are also an artist. Those Paris streets and galleries and windows and walls whispered to your heart. Hell, sometimes they yelled at you, told you they remembered, recalled your angels & fey (born from the snippets and slivers of glossy ads in magazines in case you didn’t know), the exhibitions, the foreign shores, the hours spent holding brushes and conjuring colours. You sold it well, they said. You made an impression. You left a mark. People were happy. Sometimes that’s the least you have to do. From: The Artist and the Four Hats




Job par Alfons Mucha 1896

Job done?

For a bit

Too busy writing

To try and score another hit

It’s a circle you see

A merry go round

You jump on and off at certain points

feet touch the ground

Back up again

Always looking for those special connections


Palooka N° 5


Words, Angel & Fey artwork by the editor.
Colour Angels & Fey scans taken from Palooka issue 5.
Lithograph adverts scanned from commercial postcards and tin plates are shown for illustrative purposes only. No infringement of copyright is intended.
Cat count: we spotted at least 26 images of cats in this blog post. A new TVTA record!