The Heavy Metal Kettle Special

Heavy Metal. Starlog Japan. 1981.


I’m linking up with Denise at Girlie On The Edge Blog, where she hosts Six Sentence Stories, and everyone is invited to write a story or poem or article constructed of six sentences based on a cue word given.

This week’s cue word is Kettle


There once was a lady who lived in a kettle

Who loved to listen to Heavy Metal:

Iron Maiden, Black Sabbath and AC/DC

And many more groups besides these three.

Yet she also loved other styles of music:

Gothic, Post-Punk, New Wave, New Romantic,

Classical, K-Pop, Hip-Hop and Be-Bop,

Ragamuffin, Reggae, and Lovers Rock.

There was Afrobeat, Zouk, Funk and Jazz,

Country and Western, Honkytonk and Bluegrass,

Shoegaze, Electro, Jungle and Grime,

R&B, Disco, Folk and Ragtime.

Then Punk, Ska and Rock, and Congolese Rumba,

Chicago Blues, Gospel Blues, Swamp and Delta.

And all this she loved, did that lady in the kettle,

Yet none so much as her dear Heavy Metal.

Her dear Heavy Metal, her dear Heavy Metal –

None was so loved as her dear Heavy Metal.



Thank you for rocking the metal kettle with us 🙂 \m/

1991 Rock Cards by Brokum

Here be rockers!


Iron Maiden


Mötley Crüe


Anthrax


Megadeth


Bon Jovi


Alice Cooper

And a Marvel Alice diversion… why not!

Marvel 50th Premiere. Alice Cooper. Sutton and Austin. 1979.


About Rock Cards

In 1991, the Brokum Trading Card company marketed a collectable set of heavy metal and rock band trading cards and unleashed it to the headbanging public. Cards came in random packs of 13 and featured many famous bands of the 1980s along with some class acts from the 70s. The front of each card showed a full colour photograph of the band or band member, while the back showed an additional photo along with information and stats.

Big thanks to my Canadian mate and fellow WP blogger, Resa, over at Graffiti Lux Art & More who sent me these awesome trading cards. Resa, you rock! \m/


Coming next in our Rock Cards series:

Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Exodus, Testament, Skid Row, Posion, and more!

Six Sentence Stories: The Duet at the End of the World

WH Barnes Ltd Vinyl Records. 1955. UK.

I’m linking up with Denise at Girlie On The Edge Blog, where she hosts Six Sentence Stories, and everyone is invited to write a story or poem constructed of six sentences, and six sentences only, based on a cue word given. This week’s cue word is Safety.


The Duet at the End of the World 

It was said that each evening at seven, the sound of the boy’s piano would chime from the window where he sat and played, his notes flitting about the apartments and balconies like fluttering butterflies, damselfly chords and dragonfly harmonies beating wings above rooftops and chimneys to the inevitable dusk, and the saddening of yet another thieving night.

Lo, the residents, in fear of their number – they claimed safety in the boy’s music, wore his tempos and flourishes as suits of armour against the marauding dark; his soothing renditions of Rachmaninov, Satie, Chopin, Beethoven – they placed these compositions to their hearts like a sonic crucifix to ward off the night.

The residents, ever dwindling in number – would catch their breath at the boy’s bombastic offerings of Gershwin, Joplin, Horace Silver and Thelonious Monk – once, Queen: But I’m just a poor boy and nobody loves me (He’s just a poor boy from a poor family, spare him his life from this monstrosity).

Hark, the residents, huddled in their cubes of isolation – did listen to the night come rapping at their windows with slimy fingers and hacking lungs, while the boy played on: ‘twas Holst, Mars, Bringer of War.

And it was said, as the gathering night claimed its last souls, that the boy struck notes upon his piano sweeter than a whispering call to Heaven’s gate, and that he played until midnight, and only stopped when there was no more audience to hear his song.

And then, one evening, lo, when all was silent and the night had grown old and weary and relinquished its sting, the boy played a song by Elton John… which was magically claimed by a girl’s voice, lyrics poured loud from her balcony below the boy’s window, a magenta feather boa waving to the night as she sang, she sang, she sang, she sang: I’m still standing, yeah, yeah, yeah…


Corgi audio range. 1980.

Play this one fkn loud!! \m/

1991 Rock Cards by Brokum – Having a big bad hair day!

Rock Cards collectable trading cards by Brokum, 1991.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Rikki Rockett.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Winger.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Bon Jovi.

Big, bad, beautiful hair!

In the 1980s, it was not just movie stars and TV personalities sporting audacious big hair – it was rock and heavy metal musicians too! From Poison to Cinderella to Bon Jovi to Mötley Crüe to The Cure to even Metallica at one point in their career.

This post takes a light-hearted look at some of the boys who weren’t afraid to look like girls. In short, I have nothing but admiration for them. I, too, sported various versions of big hair during my stints with bands throughout the 80s and 90s. Being in a band helped glamorise the glam I was aiming for. It was cool to go shopping for clothes you knew you were going to wear on stage at the weekend. Did I wear makeup? Eyeliner a couple of times – depended what band I was in at the time. Black nail varnish? Hell, yeah, often!

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Alice Cooper.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Jani Lane.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Mick Mars + Queen’s Royal Guard.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Jon Bon Jovi.

Damage to the environment caused by hair, 80s style

In the 1980s, scientists were making it known about the damage being caused to the ozone layer, attributed in part by harmful chlorofluoro­carbons (CFCs) found in aerosol cans like deodorant, hairspray, spray paint, and even Silly String.

I think the band I was in at the time got through enough cans of Silvikrin and Harmony hairspray we likely contributed to at least half of that hole.

It wasn’t always big hair for me though…

Here we can chart the approximate ‘style’ and ‘bigness’ of my hair throughout the 80s and 90s by comparing it to musicians from Rock Cards!


As for now… I still have hair, luckily, even though there are a fair few patches of grey. Most times it’s cut short at the sides with a spikey mop on top – a bit punky. Bathroom hair days now are only ever short compared to the best part of an hour in older days. Some gel. Wax. Easy. And if it’s a bad hair day… there’s always a hat 🙂

That’s all for now, mates! Join us again soon for more Rock Cards fun, and thank you for doing your hair with us 🙂


About Rock Cards

In 1991, the Brokum Trading Card company marketed a collectable set of heavy metal and rock band trading cards and unleashed it to the headbanging public. Cards came in random packs of 13 and featured many famous bands of the 1980s along with some class acts from the 70s. The front of each card showed a full colour photograph of the band or band member, while the back showed an additional photo along with information and stats.

Big thanks to my Canadian mate and fellow WP blogger, Resa, over at Graffiti Lux Art & More who sent me these awesome trading cards. Resa, you rock! \m/


 

Homework assignment: building a better robot

We can do it!

Gerry Anderson Andromedan Warbot. 1979. UK.

Starlog Japan. 1981. Maximilian.

Continue reading

Just can’t get enough (of 7-inch vinyl records)

A TVTA Special

 

Presenting: a gallery of seven inch vinyl records spanning the 1970s, 80s and 90s, direct from the collection of TVTA. 

 

Missing records… but look at how cool these sleeves are from the Columbia company.


Put the needle on the record!
7 inch vinyl story book records and other interesting discs. The fun starts here!

Planet of the Hoojibs. 7 inch vinyl record and book. Buena Vista Records. 1983.

Below: Masters of the Universe story books and records, French pressings
Below: The Muppets print advert

The Muppets Take Manhattan storybook and record. 1984 print advert.

Below: web-slinging, disc-spinning, abominable audio at 33​ 1⁄3 RPM on 7 inch vinyl! Phew! An Amazing Spider-Man story from Power Records.

Below: California dreamin’ Barbie

Beach Boys 7 inch flexi-disc Barbie doll record: Living Doll, Brother Records, 1987.

Below: Les mysterieuses cites D’or (The Mysterious Cities of Gold),1982

Les mysterieuses cites D’or 7 inch single. French pressing. Saban records. 1982.

Below: Albator 7 inch single, 1982

Albator 84 TV series theme. 7 inch single. 1982. French pressing. Carrere.

Below: La chanson de Kiki, 1978

La chanson de Kiki, 45 RPM record, 1978.

Below: Pac-Man as sang by Willy, 1983

Pac-Man French pressing 7 inch vinyl record, sang by Willy. 1983. Polydor Records.

That’s all folks!
Thanks for always looking on the bright side of life with us 🙂