Tag Archives: vintage

View-Master stereo images

 Peanuts – Good Grief, Beethoven! 1966


I tried to get some more shots of View-Master images taken by camera direct through a viewer – with varying degrees of success. I managed to get two Peanuts stories without too much blurring, and a whole bunch of random images from Sesame Street, The Flintstones, and The Steadfast Tin Soldier.

As my reel collection grows, it’s my aim to try and capture the best images possible – a lot of trial and error. Well, the following aren’t too shabby, as you can see, but nothing can beat seeing these wonderful 3D images with your own eyes through a View-Master! The modelmaking and photography techniques of certain reels is an absolute joy to behold.

Used to have a View-Master as a kid? Haven’t got one as an adult? What are you waiting for? They’re fairly inexpensive to buy on the second-hand market, and your eyes will thank you greatly 🙂 🙂


Peanuts – Throw it home, Snoopy! 1966


Sesame Street, People in your neighbourhood, 1982


The Steadfast Tin Soldier, Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales, 1958


Cartoon Favorites, The Flintstones, 1962


Look out for more View-Master goodies coming soon! As always, thanks for looking 🙂

View-Master reels: Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea – 1954.



The following selected scans are of the Gaf View-Master reels and packaging for Jules Verne’s sci-fi classic 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.  

More View-Master goodies can be seen here Thanks for looking 🙂


Reels and packaging images


Slide images

It’s really finicky trying to get images of View-Master slides which are less than an inch in size and more than fifty years old! I tried scanning them at first – to no avail, but ended up with some half-decent camera shots using my trusty Fuji. The set designs and character figures for the narrative are pretty stunning I think.

 


Thanks for looking 🙂 And big thanks to good friend and fellow WP blogger Spira who sent me the above View-Master reel in a recent trade. Please check out Spira’s wonderful art blog inspiration


Bonus TVTA trivia: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by French writer Jules Verne was originally published in serial format throughout 1869 and 1870. Its first translation into English language occurred in 1873, with many errors in the translation of Verne’s French, including some character changes. The French title – Vingt mille lieues sous les mers  actually means Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas – plural, not Sea singular, and relates to the distance travelled under the sea – 80,000 kilometres, and not the depth. The farthest depth reached as mentioned in the novel is only 4 leagues. The novel’s full French title is Vingt mille lieues sous les mers: Tour du monde sous-marin, “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas: A Tour of the Underwater World”. Translation and character errors occurred up until the 1960s and 1990s when attempts were made to translate the novel faithfully to Verne’s original.

TVTA Christmas selection box 2018

Christmas with the superheroes. 1989. US.

Merry Christmas vintage mates! Wishing you all love, peace, happiness, creativity and much success in 2019!

I hope you get lots of toys!!!

Lots and lots of toys!

Lots and lots and lots of toys!


… hey, who snuck a Santa skelly into the gallery above?

… Wooof?

No worries, back to the toys… where were we? Yes, hope you get lots of toys!!

… toys and toys and toys!!

… toys, toys, toys, toys, toys and toys!!!


And finally… batteries required?

No worries, TVTA has you covered!


As always, thanks for looking  🙂

View-Master reels: Peanuts, Flintstones, Hans Christian Andersen

The following selected scans are of the Gaf View-Master reels and packaging for Peanuts (1966), the Flintstones (1962), and Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales (1958). More View-Master goodies can be seen here Thanks for looking 🙂


Peanuts, 1966

View-Master. Peanuts. 1966.


The Flintstones, 1962

View-Master. The Flintstones. 1962.


Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales, 1958

View-Master. Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales. 1958.


Big thanks to good friend and fellow WP blogger Spira who sent me the above View-Master reels in a recent trade. Please check out Spira’s wonderful art blog inspiration


 

This is it, frantic ones!

With what is possibly the most strangest statement I’ve ever seen on a print advert, I present you, dear frantic ones, with a 1982 Marvel Comics ad for Hungarian Rings – just one of the many puzzles that followed the worldwide popularity trail of Rubik’s Cube. Indeed, Hungarian professor Ernõ Rubik made his own version too; his has 34 balls, the traditional ‘Hungarian’ has 38.

Hungarian Rings Marvel Comics offer. Rampage Magazine N°54. 1982. UK.

Left; Hungarian rings. Right; Rubik’s rings. Pics courtesy of Jaap’s Puzzle Page.

Quote-tastic quotations

Let’s do quotes. It might be interesting to quote from Jaap’s Puzzle Page who did so quote:  It might be interesting to quote from the afterword of the Rubik’s Cubic Compendium [p212] here. It has a picture of the Hungarian rings and the following text by David Singmaster:
Closer to Rubik’s Magic Cube are ‘interlocking cycle’ puzzles where several rings of pieces cross each other. Endre Pap, a Hungarian engineer, invented a flat version with two rings which was marketed as the Hungarian Rings. The idea was not entirely new, as there is an 1893 patent for it.

That patent is US 507,215 by William Churchill, filed on May 28 1891, granted on October 24, 1893.


In other frantic news, O frantic ones …

Role Playing Games

Secret Wars N°14. 1985. UK.

The Young All-Stars N°9. 1988.

Doctor Who

Doctor Who Monthly N°78. 1983.

Doctor Who Monthly N°78. 1983.

Captain Power

The Young All-Stars N°9. 1988. US.

It’s not too late to join the MOTU fan club is it?

Secret Wars N°14. 1985. UK.

Hey dude, this is no cartoon!

Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.

But these are!

US. Iron Man. 1979.

And finally, O fabulous frantic ones, Wonder Woman and Batman are free at last, all in the name of super breakfast cereal favourite Weetabix!

Marvel Superheroes. 1979. UK.


That’s all for now folks. Thanks for getting frantic with us 🙂


No wait …

… just time for one more … 

… it’s rather frantic …

Star Wars Weekly. 1980. UK.


🙂