Tag Archives: vintage

19th and 20th century lithographs + angels, art and advertising

American Crescent Cycles par Winthrop Ramsdell 1899

La Tournée du Chat Noir par Thoéphile Steinlen. 1896. Tin plate.


Cats That Come Back. At a poster store in Montmartre you spent your final few euros on cards depicting the lithographic advertising styles of the late 19th and early 20th century. You took photos of the outside of the poster store, and had one taken of yourself and your youngest son, a part of you indulging in some late-afternoon fantasy that you were the proprietors of said store. What fun, surrounded by art originally intended to part one from one’s cash – and a hundred years later it’s still doing the same, only selling itself this time around. What a sale, what a fine boutique did those Parisian streets make for you. For it’s easy to get lost in the culture, art and spirit of expression when it surrounds you in all its breath-taking vibrancy. There is a deep yearning. A searching back through history to find a part of yourself you may recognise. Print advertising is consumerism’s cocky high art. A brassy exhibition of wonders. A sly yet alluring gallery that invites you inside. It’s everything you love and loathe in the same moment. You pitch these paper testimonials to commercialism with all the integrity and enthusiasm of a loving archivist. But you are also an artist. Those Paris streets and galleries and windows and walls whispered to your heart. Hell, sometimes they yelled at you, told you they remembered, recalled your angels & fey (born from the snippets and slivers of glossy ads in magazines in case you didn’t know), the exhibitions, the foreign shores, the hours spent holding brushes and conjuring colours. You sold it well, they said. You made an impression. You left a mark. People were happy. Sometimes that’s the least you have to do. From: The Artist and the Four Hats




Job par Alfons Mucha 1896

Job done?

For a bit

Too busy writing

To try and score another hit

It’s a circle you see

A merry go round

You jump on and off at certain points

feet touch the ground

Back up again

Always looking for those special connections


Palooka N° 5


Words, Angel & Fey artwork by the editor.
Colour Angels & Fey scans taken from Palooka issue 5.
Lithograph adverts scanned from commercial postcards and tin plates are shown for illustrative purposes only. No infringement of copyright is intended.
Cat count: we spotted at least 26 images of cats in this blog post. A new TVTA record!

The Ups and Downs of the Cat

“Wooof, please stop jumping up and down on top of the scanner,” I said to the office cat this morning. “Look what you’ve gone and done to our advert for ‘Splash Out’. I’m going to have to scan it again now!”



“It’s not me!” replied the cat. “It’s this new Yo-Yo I bought from the toy shop in town. It seems to have a mind all of it’s own!”

“Yo-Yo you say? That reminds me, I need to scan a couple of Yo-Yo adverts I found in the archives – if you’ve quite finished destroying the office equipment?”

“No worries,” said the cat. “I’ll go practice my Yo-Yo skills in the garden.”

“Not too close to the greenhouse though, eh?”

“Do you think I’m that daft?”

Later … Smash! Tinkle! Shatter! Meeeowwwlll!


1980s Coca-Cola and Fanta Yo-Yos by Russell

In other Up and Down news…
R2-D2 defies gravity, C-3PO keeps his feet on the ground …

Illustration by David Kawami from The Star Wars Question and Answer Book about Space. 1979.

Q: What cool thing happens when you cross a video game icon with bubble gum and pocket money? 
A: The Pac-Man Bubble Gum Money Box! (I so want one of these!)

Hamleys. UK. 1983.

Oops! Putting your foot in it …

Hamleys. UK. 1983.

Nadia and her gymnasium

Ets De Neuter. 1995. France.

Make friends … yes 🙂

Junior Sales Club. 1974

The Whizz Kids Guide, How To books

Star Wars Weekly. UK. 1979.

Big Jim, Big Josh, Big Jack, Dr. Acero

Congost catalogue. 1977. Spain.

Crashback – crushable and expandable vans on command! 

More Fun From Kenner. US. 1997.

XRC by Tonka

More Fun From Kenner. US. 1997.

Here be dragons …

Hamleys. UK. 1983.

That’s all for now vintage mates. I’m off to buy new window panes for the TVTA greenhouse. Wooof’s off to Yo-Yo lessons for cats. See you soon 🙂

 

500th Post at The Vintage Toy Advertiser!

It’s a milestone moment for TVTA as we celebrate our 500th post.

I remember moving over to WordPress in the spring of 2011 and thinking: “well, this seems like a good place to be.” Fast forward a few years and my thoughts haven’t changed a bit. Much of this is down to you, dear readers and fellow bloggers, for checking out, sharing, liking and commenting on my posts and helping to make TVTA’s mission a whole lot of interesting fun. Thanks WP mates 🙂

So, what’s hot off the scanner to celebrate post N° 500… some obscure toy ad? Barbie, Etch A Sketch, Mr. Potato Head, Slinky Dog? No, but there were a few little clues back there wink wink

How about some horror film ads, vinyl records, video games, poetry or kitchen work units?

Nope, none of those. And definitely no clown ads!!

So what is it then?

it had better be good!

It is…

… After an executive board meeting with Wooof, the cat and I have decided to celebrate our special 500th toy story with Toy Story! All told in the wonderful style of Japanese chirashi movie posters.

Regular readers will know how much we love our Japanese chirashi around here 🙂

So let’s hand over to Woody and Buzz and co for TVTA’s 500th post … Toy Story!

As always, thanks for looking 🙂

 

 

Toy Story (1995)


Toy Story 2 (1999)


Toy Story 3 (2010)


In other Toy Story news …
Toy Story 2 Japanese Movie Programme cover, centrefold and adverts

 


Disneyland x3. Original 90s Buzz Lightyear toy. DVDs

 


To infinity and beyond! Until next time  🙂


Photographs TVTA. Images scanned by TVTA from private collection.

Mebetoys die cast vehicles

It’s another new entry at TVTA as we present Mebetoys scans from a mid-1970s French catalogue and three Mebetoys pages from a 1973 French Solido catalogue. 

Mebetoys was owned by the famous Italian family the Besana brothers who produced and sold highly-detailed die cast cars throughout the 1960s and 1970s. In 1969 Mattel purchased the company freeing the Besana brothers to form the Martoys company which later became one of the biggest and highly respected die cast car makers of all time Bburago.

Information gathered from the excellent Gran Toros website. Click images to go bigger.


Mebetoys as seen in a Mattel French catalogue circa mid-1970s.

Front cover of Mebetoys catalogue. France.



Back cover of Mebetoys catalogue. France.


Mebetoys pages as seen in a 1973 Solido catalogue, France




Thanks for looking 🙂

Corgi absolutely nailed it for die cast pop culture

My adverts section for Corgi Toys shows some cool superhero, film and TV-themed die cast vehicles, and I always knew that Corgi was spot on when it came to representing pop culture in its die cast range. Even so, I wasn’t quite prepared for the images that greeted me as I took hold of a copy of the Paris-based Fair Play Distribution Catalogue from 1980.

This A4 toy brochure aimed at shops and stores features more pop culture goodness than you can shake a Penguin umbrella at, including many fabulous point-of-sale store displays. If these toy units don’t take you back to happy childhood times spent at the toy shop buying cars then I don’t know what will. Simply amazing to see.

The catalogue also features Corgi’s regular die cast vehicle range, which will have to come in a separate post as there are just too many photos to show in one outing, and as Wooof correctly points out, TVTA readers may be in severe danger of a vintage-joy circuit overload. Enjoy the scans!

1980 Fair Play Distribution Catalogue, France

Corgi Juniors

Point-of-Sale Displays


As always, thanks for looking  🙂