Tag Archives: vintage

View-Master reels – Star Trek, 1982



Presenting: packaging and reel images for the 1982 View-Master Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan.

Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan. View Master. 1982.


Reel images. Click to enlarge.



Thanks for looking 🙂 More View-Master goodies can be seen here 

Top tips for being a successful blogger in an age of uncertainty


Greetings vintage mates,

If you wish to become a successful blogger in this age of uncertainty,

you will need…

#1 – a ridiculous but click-worthy title. Like the one I’ve used for today’s post. Utterly meaningless. But somewhat intriguing. I’d click on it for sure.

You will also need…

#2 – attention-grabbing pic fairly early on, as some people simply won’t be bothered to read your words, no matter how good a wordsmith you are. I already added a cool pic at the start of the post, but here’s another one to keep things fresh…

How to handle your hamster correctly.


#3 – you will also need a sense of self-deprecation. As editor of TVTA I daily suck at many things. I try to do well but often fail miserably, or spectacularly. Here I am one time in Paris, trying to look cool but in reality taking up valuable image hosting space which could be used for something far more useful. Thank goodness I don’t have a Facebook or Instagram to share this photo on!

I eat croissants. Portrait of the artist in pre-tentious moment of vintage grandeur. Mon Dieu, I love France, and it’s curious and beautiful people, and old-school postcards, and display rack anti-theft devices.


To be a successful blogger in an age of uncertainty you will also need:

#4 – a loyal and intrepid office cat. Like TVTA’s very own Wooof! 75% of stuff that gets done around here can be attributed to the cat. The other 25% is me, but only because the cat has mind-control powers which I am unable to resist – no matter how often I wear my protective blue and red lens vintage 3D glasses, or the orange and purple-striped teflon-lined woolen jersey Mrs Coldkettle the tea lady knitted me last winter.

Wooof, TVTA intrepid office cat (in secret moustache and Dicky Bow disguise kit).


#5 – a fear of clowns. This will help you to focus, stay sharp, and keep you on your blogging toes at all times!

Run like the wind!


#6 – space ships. Statistics show that 71% of successful bloggers in an age of uncertainty have access to functional spaceships.


#7 – Giant motorised fruit and vegetables. A must-have for bloggers in an age of uncertainty!


#8 – you will also need a Karma Credit Roll

What’s this?

A Karma Credit Roll, or as TVTA likes to sometimes call it The Boomerang In Your Arms Effect is quite simply the force of love. In the words of the great German thinker/Scorpions vocalist, Klaus Mein: “The more love you give, the more you’ll find.” In blogging terms this can be related to an appreciation of the works of your fellow bloggers to gain an appreciation of your own work, while at the same time creating an enriching environment for all.


#9 – you’re also gonna need a stack of vintage adverts, magazines and comics! (if that’s your thing). Luckily Wooof and I have a few thousand of these scattered around the place…


#10 – and lastly, to be a successful blogger in an age of uncertainty, you will need to post a Top-Ten list of something you think is cool, even if it’s been done before, or it’s not cool, or it doesn’t make any sense – you absolutely must (by internet law) make a Top-Ten list of something… which is exactly what I’ve done with this post 🙂

Now, sit back, soak up all those likes, comments, reblogs, and endorsements from major corporations and Hollywood stars. You’ve earned it baby!

Suggested power song to blog to today: “The Best” by Tina Turner.

As always, thanks for looking 🙂

This post was brought to you by office cat disguise kits and top ten lists of top ten things to top ten list about when you generally avoid top ten things. No hamsters, fruit or vegetables were handled incorrectly in this production. All images courtesy of French comic/magazine Pif Gadget

View-Master stereo images

 Peanuts – Good Grief, Beethoven! 1966


I tried to get some more shots of View-Master images taken by camera direct through a viewer – with varying degrees of success. I managed to get two Peanuts stories without too much blurring, and a whole bunch of random images from Sesame Street, The Flintstones, and The Steadfast Tin Soldier.

As my reel collection grows, it’s my aim to try and capture the best images possible – a lot of trial and error. Well, the following aren’t too shabby, as you can see, but nothing can beat seeing these wonderful 3D images with your own eyes through a View-Master! The modelmaking and photography techniques of certain reels is an absolute joy to behold.

Used to have a View-Master as a kid? Haven’t got one as an adult? What are you waiting for? They’re fairly inexpensive to buy on the second-hand market, and your eyes will thank you greatly 🙂 🙂


Peanuts – Throw it home, Snoopy! 1966


Sesame Street, People in your neighbourhood, 1982


The Steadfast Tin Soldier, Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales, 1958


Cartoon Favorites, The Flintstones, 1962


Look out for more View-Master goodies coming soon! As always, thanks for looking 🙂

View-Master reels: Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea – 1954.



The following selected scans are of the Gaf View-Master reels and packaging for Jules Verne’s sci-fi classic 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.  

More View-Master goodies can be seen here Thanks for looking 🙂


Reels and packaging images


Slide images

It’s really finicky trying to get images of View-Master slides which are less than an inch in size and more than fifty years old! I tried scanning them at first – to no avail, but ended up with some half-decent camera shots using my trusty Fuji. The set designs and character figures for the narrative are pretty stunning I think.

 


Thanks for looking 🙂 And big thanks to good friend and fellow WP blogger Spira who sent me the above View-Master reel in a recent trade. Please check out Spira’s wonderful art blog inspiration


Bonus TVTA trivia: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by French writer Jules Verne was originally published in serial format throughout 1869 and 1870. Its first translation into English language occurred in 1873, with many errors in the translation of Verne’s French, including some character changes. The French title – Vingt mille lieues sous les mers  actually means Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas – plural, not Sea singular, and relates to the distance travelled under the sea – 80,000 kilometres, and not the depth. The farthest depth reached as mentioned in the novel is only 4 leagues. The novel’s full French title is Vingt mille lieues sous les mers: Tour du monde sous-marin, “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas: A Tour of the Underwater World”. Translation and character errors occurred up until the 1960s and 1990s when attempts were made to translate the novel faithfully to Verne’s original.

TVTA Christmas selection box 2018

Christmas with the superheroes. 1989. US.

Merry Christmas vintage mates! Wishing you all love, peace, happiness, creativity and much success in 2019!

I hope you get lots of toys!!!

Lots and lots of toys!

Lots and lots and lots of toys!


… hey, who snuck a Santa skelly into the gallery above?

… Wooof?

No worries, back to the toys… where were we? Yes, hope you get lots of toys!!

… toys and toys and toys!!

… toys, toys, toys, toys, toys and toys!!!


And finally… batteries required?

No worries, TVTA has you covered!


As always, thanks for looking  🙂

View-Master reels: Peanuts, Flintstones, Hans Christian Andersen

The following selected scans are of the Gaf View-Master reels and packaging for Peanuts (1966), the Flintstones (1962), and Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales (1958). More View-Master goodies can be seen here Thanks for looking 🙂


Peanuts, 1966

View-Master. Peanuts. 1966.


The Flintstones, 1962

View-Master. The Flintstones. 1962.


Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales, 1958

View-Master. Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales. 1958.


Big thanks to good friend and fellow WP blogger Spira who sent me the above View-Master reels in a recent trade. Please check out Spira’s wonderful art blog inspiration


 

This is it, frantic ones!

With what is possibly the most strangest statement I’ve ever seen on a print advert, I present you, dear frantic ones, with a 1982 Marvel Comics ad for Hungarian Rings – just one of the many puzzles that followed the worldwide popularity trail of Rubik’s Cube. Indeed, Hungarian professor Ernõ Rubik made his own version too; his has 34 balls, the traditional ‘Hungarian’ has 38.

Hungarian Rings Marvel Comics offer. Rampage Magazine N°54. 1982. UK.

Left; Hungarian rings. Right; Rubik’s rings. Pics courtesy of Jaap’s Puzzle Page.

Quote-tastic quotations

Let’s do quotes. It might be interesting to quote from Jaap’s Puzzle Page who did so quote:  It might be interesting to quote from the afterword of the Rubik’s Cubic Compendium [p212] here. It has a picture of the Hungarian rings and the following text by David Singmaster:
Closer to Rubik’s Magic Cube are ‘interlocking cycle’ puzzles where several rings of pieces cross each other. Endre Pap, a Hungarian engineer, invented a flat version with two rings which was marketed as the Hungarian Rings. The idea was not entirely new, as there is an 1893 patent for it.

That patent is US 507,215 by William Churchill, filed on May 28 1891, granted on October 24, 1893.


In other frantic news, O frantic ones …

Role Playing Games

Secret Wars N°14. 1985. UK.

The Young All-Stars N°9. 1988.

Doctor Who

Doctor Who Monthly N°78. 1983.

Doctor Who Monthly N°78. 1983.

Captain Power

The Young All-Stars N°9. 1988. US.

It’s not too late to join the MOTU fan club is it?

Secret Wars N°14. 1985. UK.

Hey dude, this is no cartoon!

Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.

But these are!

US. Iron Man. 1979.

And finally, O fabulous frantic ones, Wonder Woman and Batman are free at last, all in the name of super breakfast cereal favourite Weetabix!

Marvel Superheroes. 1979. UK.


That’s all for now folks. Thanks for getting frantic with us 🙂


No wait …

… just time for one more … 

… it’s rather frantic …

Star Wars Weekly. 1980. UK.


🙂

19th and 20th century lithographs + angels, art and advertising

American Crescent Cycles par Winthrop Ramsdell 1899

La Tournée du Chat Noir par Thoéphile Steinlen. 1896. Tin plate.


Cats That Come Back. At a poster store in Montmartre you spent your final few euros on cards depicting the lithographic advertising styles of the late 19th and early 20th century. You took photos of the outside of the poster store, and had one taken of yourself and your youngest son, a part of you indulging in some late-afternoon fantasy that you were the proprietors of said store. What fun, surrounded by art originally intended to part one from one’s cash – and a hundred years later it’s still doing the same, only selling itself this time around. What a sale, what a fine boutique did those Parisian streets make for you. For it’s easy to get lost in the culture, art and spirit of expression when it surrounds you in all its breath-taking vibrancy. There is a deep yearning. A searching back through history to find a part of yourself you may recognise. Print advertising is consumerism’s cocky high art. A brassy exhibition of wonders. A sly yet alluring gallery that invites you inside. It’s everything you love and loathe in the same moment. You pitch these paper testimonials to commercialism with all the integrity and enthusiasm of a loving archivist. But you are also an artist. Those Paris streets and galleries and windows and walls whispered to your heart. Hell, sometimes they yelled at you, told you they remembered, recalled your angels & fey (born from the snippets and slivers of glossy ads in magazines in case you didn’t know), the exhibitions, the foreign shores, the hours spent holding brushes and conjuring colours. You sold it well, they said. You made an impression. You left a mark. People were happy. Sometimes that’s the least you have to do. From: The Artist and the Four Hats




Job par Alfons Mucha 1896

Job done?

For a bit

Too busy writing

To try and score another hit

It’s a circle you see

A merry go round

You jump on and off at certain points

feet touch the ground

Back up again

Always looking for those special connections


Palooka N° 5


Words, Angel & Fey artwork by the editor.
Colour Angels & Fey scans taken from Palooka issue 5.
Lithograph adverts scanned from commercial postcards and tin plates are shown for illustrative purposes only. No infringement of copyright is intended.
Cat count: we spotted at least 26 images of cats in this blog post. A new TVTA record!