Tag Archives: nostalgia

I need gorilla info – fast!

So I’ll just go check my preferred search engine of choice.

But back in pre-internet days, if I wanted to find out about gorillas, or leopards, or Indian elephants, I had to work for it. It usually involved a trip to the local or school library, or consultation with the hefty family encylopedia that was so heavy it required two people to lift it from the  bookshelf, or questions aimed at one of my more brainier friends or relatives. Or else, if I’d have known they’d existed in 1980-something or so, I could have collected Animal Cards!

Animal Cards. This four page UK promotional leaflet from Heron Books came inside a copy of Star wars Weekly from 1980. Readers were invited to become subscribers and receive card sets and a filing case in which to store them. The cards were printed with colour photographs, facts and information, and contained four different ways of filing classification depending on your favourite category. The promotional leaflet contains a written endorsement from the World Wildlife Fund.


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Thanks for stopping by  🙂


In other gorilla news…

US. Weird War Tals. 1974.

France. Pif Gadget. 1983.

UK. Planet of the Apes and Dracula Lives. #94. 1976.

1975 Penguin UK edition of Planet of the Apes by Pierre Boulle.

US. The Defenders. 1977.

Never mind the adverts (Pt9)

Welcome to part 9 of TVTA’s series Never Mind The Adverts.

In this edition we focus on James Bond 007 Spy cards.


A collection completed!

Today I finally completed my 007 trading card set! I needed five cards to finish, two of them super-rares. The cards were released in 2008 by GE Fabbri Ltd alongside a fortnightly run of magazines containing facts and info on the James Bond films. The magazines and cards were available to buy in UK newsagents. There were 275 cards to collect, trade and play with (each card has numerical statistics similar to Top Trumps).

A collectors tin was offered with issue 2 in which to store your cards. Mini albums were also available if you wanted to display in a reading format. Other items included a 007 spy pen and a burglar alarm toy. Some of the items were only available for subscribers and were not sold in shops.

Got, got, got, haven’t got, got…

After spending a small fortune and finding that I needed only a dozen or so cards to finish, I stopped buying the cards as I was only turning up doubles. When GE Fabbri discontinued the line I was disappointed to learn that unlike other trading card companies such as Panini, they didn’t offer an end service to buy directly any remaining cards needed. So, it was off to eBay for me to chase the stragglers. At first it was easy, but trying to find the last five I needed for a fair price proved to be difficult. That is until this week, when after a considerable hiatus I decided to hunt down those last stragglers and got lucky!

And here they are…


A small breakdown of what was available either in-store or as a subscriber exclusive…

Issue 1 backing board that was available in newsagents for the series launch. In the foreground is the collectable storage tin that came with issue 2..


Storage tin showing a complete collection of the 275 trading cards. You can also see the double-sided poster standing in the inside of the lid which doubled as a checklist to track and mark off each card.


007 burglar alarm toy, two spy pens, and the wrapper from an opened pack of cards.


Series magazines and cardboard storage box.


The name’s Bond. James Bond. These cards are dedicated to the various actors who played the role.


Villains, allies, Bond girls, gadgets and vehicles!








To sum up, I’m delighted to finally finish this collection. The colourful cards are packed with interesting characters, gadgets and vehicles that span all the Bond films up to Daniel Craig’s first outing. There are plenty of metallic foils to collect along with a small number of super-rare tilting double image cards, making this set hard to complete yet not impossible – even almost ten years later on the secondary market. The magazines are well-produced and the extras are good fun. The collectors tin adds a touch of elegance but needs to be handled with care as the metal is very thin and prone to dents and scratches.

Marks out of ten for the entire set and the collecting experience: a solid 8.5.


That’s all for now. Thanks for looking, and join us again soon for another Never Mind The Adverts!

Danish Retro (Pt 3)

Welcome to the third part of Danish Retro.

In this edition we look at a variety of products as advertised in Denmark in the 1970s and 80s. Featuring: Jan books, Famous Five books, Transformers, Action Force, Kinder Surprise, MB Games, Matchbox cars, Matilda dolls, Lego, Tony the Tiger and Coco Pops. Thanks for looking!

Part Two can be seen here


Jan

Denmark. 1976.


Famous Five Books with… skateboarding

Denmark. 1987.


Transformers Panini stickers

Panini Transformers. Denmark.


Action Force

Action Force stickers. Denmark.

Denmark. 1988.


Mon Chhichi

Denmark. 1980.


Kinder Surprise

1988.

1988.

1989.


Superman

Denmark.


MB Games

MB Games. Denmark. 1988.


Matchbox

Denmark. 1980.


Matilda Doll

Denmark. 1980.

 


Lego

Denmark. 1978.

Denmark. 1980.


Denmark. 1981.


Kellogg’s Frosties

1988.

1984.

1986.


Coco Pops

1988.


 

48, 55, 73, 76, 81, 98.

Do you have a favourite number? Can you find the numbers in the adverts below? What is the significance of the numbers in the post title? Some numbers may be relevant to you, others not. TVTA is proud to present a selection of twentieth century numbers. In no particular order. Join us as we countdown in three, two, one…


31.


007.


13.


6,000,000.


4.


5.


2.


2.


2000.


2 + A (1) = 3.


1664.


666.


999.


101.

France. Pif Gadget N° 616. 1981.


6.

UK. Film Review. July 1979.


1.

UK. 2000 AD. 1983.


440.

US. Weird War Tales. 1981.


5.

UK. Doctor Who Magazine. 2013.


1 – 90 or 1- 75 and other variations.


54.


100.

Ron Wing to rule them all

US. Creepy Mag. 1980.

Wooof just came flying into the scanning room in a state of panic.

“What’s the trouble?” I said.

“I accidently messed up the settings on our new time machine,” replied the cat. “We have less than six minutes before time splits into two, erases our recent posts, and the bailiffs come to take our scanner! In addition to this, we’ll be talking in spoonerisms and nonsense.”

“Bloody hell Wooof,” I said. “We already talk enough nonsense at The Vintage Toy Advertiser as it is. And may I remind you, the last time this happened we ended up crashing into the darkside of Planet Jupiter!”

“Stop moaning,” said the cat. “And post up the ads!”

INSERT TIME TRAVEL NOISE HERE: Whooooooooshhhhhhhh…

(six minutes later)

Wooof just came skying into the flanning room in a plate of static.

“Trots the wubble?” I said.

“I maccidently assed up the settings on our new wine machine,” replied the cat. “We have less than six biscuits before time tits into sploo, erases our decent roasts, and the bailiffs come to bake our spanner! In addition to this, we’ll be talking in noonerisms and sponsense.”

“Hoody bell Wooof!” I said. “We already talk enough nonsense at The Toasted Sandwich Advertiser as it is. And ray I me-mind you, the last time this happened we ended up crashing into the backside of Janet Plutiter!”

“Mop stoning,” said the cat. “And toast up the pads!”


TVTA is proud to present a tantalising mixed-up time treat of inflatable bunnies, scarecrows, rollerskates, kangaRoos, monsters and spooks, and more inflatables!

Playmates Bunnies. Ideal Toys catalogue. 1972. UK.


Scarecrow Target Set. Ideal Toys catalogue. 1972. UK.


Lundi rollerskates. Denmark. 1980.


Pop Wheels. Italy. Topolino. 1978.


Gioca rollerskates. Topolono. Italy. 1978


KangaRoos. Denmark.


KangaRoos. Denmark.


Monsters and Spooks model kits. Airfix catalogue. 1984. UK.


Slim Jim. Jonah Hex. 1978. US.


US. 1976.


US. 1976.


Feel the love or feel the pain? Elastic Man and Elastic Monstre get stretchy. France. 1978.


Playmate’s Disney characters. Ideal Toys catalogue. 1972. UK.


Tom and Jerry Playmates inflatables. UK. Ideal catalogue. 1972.

Beautiful Crissy by Ideal

Beautiful Crissy was first marketed by Ideal Toys in 1969. The doll has a unique feature whereby her hair can be ‘grown’ by adjusting a switch on her back to make it longer or shorter. Crissy measures just over 17 inches in height (approx 43 cm) and comes with fashion outfits and accessories, as well as a range of ‘family and friends’ dolls to keep her company.

Scans taken from the Ideal Toy company dealer catalogue, 1972.