The mysterious case of the pink case, and a 40th Maiden!

Greetings vintage mates!

What’s in the case??

It’s a rather elegant case…

Compact, a dreamy pink colour…

Somewhat vintage…

But what does it contain?

Let’s open it up to find out…

Holy dinky retro-cool record players in pink cases! It’s a Muse Vintage Collection vinyl record player, a Father’s Day gift from your humble TVTA editor to himself! Thanks me, you rock!

This compact yet sturdy machine is ideal to test out the second-hand vinyl goodies I sometimes find at flea markets. At home I have a sweet hi-fi seperates system that’s packed away due to no space in my teeny-tiny Hobbit apartment, and is a mission to set up. The Muse compact is a blessing for an instant blast.

First 45rpm I tested…

But then…

Along came this…

Yet another Father’s Day treat from myself to myself! Thanks again, me, you really do rock this year!

A 40th Maiden?

The Number of the Beast is 40 in 2022. Was it really that long ago an eleven year-old me was tear-arsing it to the local record shop to buy this amazing album upon its release? And how about my cut-off denim jacket which proudly displayed a full sew-on back patch of the famous Derek Riggs album art? I remember a kindly retired neighbour offered to sew that patch for me. Seeing this record again sure brings back some memories!

Thanks for looking. Happy Father’s Day to daddies everywhere 😎

Roblock – transforming robots you build!

Roblock was introduced around 1984 as part of the TENTE construction toy range by Exin-Lines Bros S.A., probably as a cash-in on the trend for transforming toys such as Go-Bots, Transformers and the like. The difference was that Roblock robots had to be built first – brick by brick, with special hinges enabling the vehicle parts to become robots.

Roblocks might appear as simplistic and cartoonish for a transforming toy robot, but for me they add a special cool factor with their bold colour schemes, striking decals and fun element… I mean, who can resist a sci-fi, earth-moving machine on caterpillar treads, which can transform into a frog? That’s the kooky joy that is Frogster. See pic below…

Tente Roblock featuring the models Defender, Dark Warrior and Frogster. Exin catalogue, 1988, Spain.
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Exin Castles

Exin Castles, known as ‘Exin Castillos’ in its Spanish country of origin, is an interlocking construction toy similar to its competitor Lego. The sets were based on the concept of medieval and fantasy castles (beating Lego, who would introduce the same themes later on) and were introduced in 1968 by Exin-Lines Bros S.A. of Barcelona, Spain. Exin was also well known for its hugely popular TENTE range of interlocking bricks.

TVTA is pleased to present images from the 1988 English/French language Exin catalogue, printed in Spain, featuring sets from the Exin Castles line as well as sets from the Golden Series line.


Exin Castles. 1988 Exin catalogue. Spain.

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Fashion, movie and style images from Jours de France magazine issue #750 1969

Jours De France 750 1969. Brigitte Bardot et Maurice Ronet.

Jours de France was a popular French weekly women’s print magazine published between 1954 and 1989. The magazine featured articles and photographs on fashion, cinema, writers, artists and musicians, as well as cartoons and puzzles. TVTA was lucky to get hold of issue #750 from 1969 with actress Gina Lollobrigida on the cover. The issue is jam-packed with superb images of late 1960s French culture, as well as an abundance of print adverts from popular brands which were the main source of revenue for magazines like Jours de France.

At more than 260 pages long, there is bound to be a ‘part two’ to this post. I was unable to scan the images due to the sheer size and weight of the magazine being too much for the TVTA A4 office scanner, so all images from this issue are presented as photographs.

Enjoy 🙂

– Ford.

Jours De France 750 1969. Cover. Gina Lollobrigida.

Jours De France 750 1969. Robert Hossein et Marisa Mell.


French fashion and style

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The most random set of postcards you’ll see all week…

Random. We love random here at TVTA, and some of these postcards I’ve had since the late 80s, while others are recent additions. Featuring films, tourist destinations, public events, rude anagrams, Kate Bush and, yay, Cartman – “You will respect my authority!!” There’s a little something for everyone here…

Where possible I’ve included the publishers of the postcards, relevant dates, photographers and artists.

Enjoy the scans!


Late 19th century lithographs 


Tourism

South Wales and Normandy

South Wales. Precision Ltd. Colourmaster International. Date unknown.

Normandie. Artaud PĂ©re et Fils. Gabycolor. Date unknown.

Lourdes, Costa Brava, Bordeaux, Eiffel Tower and Blackpool.


You shall not pass!

Some Birmingham facts and trivia alert!

The postcard below depicts Sare Hole Mill in Moseley, Birmingham, UK. Titled: ‘View from the pool’, the image was taken in 1921.

This location in Moseley is one of ‘The Shire’ inspirations Tolkien drew from when he lived in Birmingham and later wrote The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings trilogy. In the noughties I used to live just up the road from this mill and was lucky to take a tour inside when it was operational. When taking my frequent walks through the surrounding natural park, bogs and woods, it really felt like I’d been transported to Middle England and ‘The Shire’. It’s easy to see how Tolkien fell in love with this place and became inspired.

Sare Hole Mill, Moseley, Birmingham, UK. View from the pool. 1921.

Just for fun #1: Opposite the mill was a cafĂ© called ‘The Hungry Hobbit’. Just for fun #2: It never escaped the attention of residents of Birmingham that the name ‘Sare Hole’ is an anagram of a certain body part. Just for fun #3: A couple of districts away lies a road called ‘Dog Pool Lane’, where visitors often had fun whitening-out the letter ‘L’ of ‘Pool’. A couple of other districts away is ‘Cockshut Hill’ – I won’t say how a certain letter was changed on that signpost. Safe to say though that upwards of Birmingham, in North Warwickshire where I lived for a spell, was a place called ‘Harts Hill’, where some cheeky little beggar changed the first letter ‘H’ to an ‘F’. Farts Hill. Don’t you just love British toilet humour?

But seriously, Birmingham… below is a postcard I picked up from the Weoley Castle Museum (where I lived nearby for two spells), depicting an archer on a decorated floor tile circa 1350.

Decorated Floor Tile circa 1350. Discovered during excavations of Weoley Castle. Birmingham. UK. Silk and Terry Ltd. Birmingham.


London

Tower of London. Published by The Ministry of Works. Date unknown.


Film, Music and Art


And lastly… South Park –

“You will respect my authority!!”

South Park. The London Postcard Company. 1999.


Thanks for looking 😀 We’ll let you know as soon we get our hands on another bunch of random postcards!