Tag Archives: vintage advertising

This is it, frantic ones!

With what is possibly the most strangest statement I’ve ever seen on a print advert, I present you, dear frantic ones, with a 1982 Marvel Comics ad for Hungarian Rings – just one of the many puzzles that followed the worldwide popularity trail of Rubik’s Cube. Indeed, Hungarian professor Ernõ Rubik made his own version too; his has 34 balls, the traditional ‘Hungarian’ has 38.

Hungarian Rings Marvel Comics offer. Rampage Magazine N°54. 1982. UK.

Left; Hungarian rings. Right; Rubik’s rings. Pics courtesy of Jaap’s Puzzle Page.

Quote-tastic quotations

Let’s do quotes. It might be interesting to quote from Jaap’s Puzzle Page who did so quote:  It might be interesting to quote from the afterword of the Rubik’s Cubic Compendium [p212] here. It has a picture of the Hungarian rings and the following text by David Singmaster:
Closer to Rubik’s Magic Cube are ‘interlocking cycle’ puzzles where several rings of pieces cross each other. Endre Pap, a Hungarian engineer, invented a flat version with two rings which was marketed as the Hungarian Rings. The idea was not entirely new, as there is an 1893 patent for it.

That patent is US 507,215 by William Churchill, filed on May 28 1891, granted on October 24, 1893.


In other frantic news, O frantic ones …

Role Playing Games

Secret Wars N°14. 1985. UK.

The Young All-Stars N°9. 1988.

Doctor Who

Doctor Who Monthly N°78. 1983.

Doctor Who Monthly N°78. 1983.

Captain Power

The Young All-Stars N°9. 1988. US.

It’s not too late to join the MOTU fan club is it?

Secret Wars N°14. 1985. UK.

Hey dude, this is no cartoon!

Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.

But these are!

US. Iron Man. 1979.

And finally, O fabulous frantic ones, Wonder Woman and Batman are free at last, all in the name of super breakfast cereal favourite Weetabix!

Marvel Superheroes. 1979. UK.


That’s all for now folks. Thanks for getting frantic with us 🙂


No wait …

… just time for one more … 

… it’s rather frantic …

Star Wars Weekly. 1980. UK.


🙂

Fightin’ Talk

Die Cut N°4. 1994. US.


Ten testosterone-filled, sword-wielding, fist-flying, karate-kickin’, armour-melting, laser-firing, ear-boxing, shark-attacking video game adverts from big boys Nintendo, Sega, Atari, Activision, Capcom, Acclaim, Konami and Taito. 


Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.

Die CutN°4. 1994. US.

Die Cut N°4. 1994. US.

Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.

Die Cut N°4. 1994. US.

Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.

Detective Comics N°651. 1992. US.

Die Cut N°4. 1994. US.

Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.

19th and 20th century lithographs + angels, art and advertising

American Crescent Cycles par Winthrop Ramsdell 1899

La Tournée du Chat Noir par Thoéphile Steinlen. 1896. Tin plate.


Cats That Come Back. At a poster store in Montmartre you spent your final few euros on cards depicting the lithographic advertising styles of the late 19th and early 20th century. You took photos of the outside of the poster store, and had one taken of yourself and your youngest son, a part of you indulging in some late-afternoon fantasy that you were the proprietors of said store. What fun, surrounded by art originally intended to part one from one’s cash – and a hundred years later it’s still doing the same, only selling itself this time around. What a sale, what a fine boutique did those Parisian streets make for you. For it’s easy to get lost in the culture, art and spirit of expression when it surrounds you in all its breath-taking vibrancy. There is a deep yearning. A searching back through history to find a part of yourself you may recognise. Print advertising is consumerism’s cocky high art. A brassy exhibition of wonders. A sly yet alluring gallery that invites you inside. It’s everything you love and loathe in the same moment. You pitch these paper testimonials to commercialism with all the integrity and enthusiasm of a loving archivist. But you are also an artist. Those Paris streets and galleries and windows and walls whispered to your heart. Hell, sometimes they yelled at you, told you they remembered, recalled your angels & fey (born from the snippets and slivers of glossy ads in magazines in case you didn’t know), the exhibitions, the foreign shores, the hours spent holding brushes and conjuring colours. You sold it well, they said. You made an impression. You left a mark. People were happy. Sometimes that’s the least you have to do. From: The Artist and the Four Hats




Job par Alfons Mucha 1896

Job done?

For a bit

Too busy writing

To try and score another hit

It’s a circle you see

A merry go round

You jump on and off at certain points

feet touch the ground

Back up again

Always looking for those special connections


Palooka N° 5


Words, Angel & Fey artwork by the editor.
Colour Angels & Fey scans taken from Palooka issue 5.
Lithograph adverts scanned from commercial postcards and tin plates are shown for illustrative purposes only. No infringement of copyright is intended.
Cat count: we spotted at least 26 images of cats in this blog post. A new TVTA record!