Tag Archives: vintage advertising

Four Frosties ads

By Kellogg’s – Life Magazine-page 133, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=17184950

Kellogg’s Frosties is a breakfast cereal introduced in the United States in 1952. Tony the Tiger has been the brand’s mascot since its introduction, and has the catchphrase:

“They’re Grrrrreat!”

Tony is always drawn wearing a red bandana around his neck, which is sometimes plain red, can sport the name ‘Tony’, or is chequered with circles – as seen in early renditions like the Life Magazine pic above. In the first advert below, Tony can be seen wearing a spotted bow tie – perhaps in honour of his “roaring reporter” role.

I’ve always liked Tony as a breakfast mascot, he seems a friendly sort of Tiger who would probably organise lots of tiger dinner parties, and not only play the part of perfect host but keep peace between the likes of Shere Khan, Tigger, Tigress, Richard Parker and any other famous tigers you can think of!

Enjoy the ads, they’re grrrreat!

UK. Planet of the Apes. 1976.


Denmark. Anders And & Co. 1981.


Denmark. Anders And & Co. 1987.


Denmark. Anders And & Co. 1986.


 

Latest ads: Sci-Fi cereals and then there was Groo

Seven new ads (and one book cover) packed with scintillating sci-fi flavours, a twist of Spider-ery Cap ‘N Crunch breakfast cereal, and some sword and sorcery buffoonery of the highest degree from Groo the Wanderer.


US. Alpha Flight. 1987.


US. Ghostly Haunts. 1976.


France. Pif Gadget. 1980.



UK. Starburst. 1984.


UK. 2000 AD. 1987.


US. X-Factor. 1986.


US. X-Factor. 1987.


 

Non-toy ad Tuesday: what’s a weekly?

“Zoey and Danny … following the recent zombie holocaust, and as the only surviving children of this school, I’m delighted to inform you that you’ve been made prefects! Now, all you have to do to claim your shiny new badges is explain to me what is a ‘weekly’ …”

Our office cat, Wooof, recently posed the question, What is a weekly?

It’s generally some sort of publication that occurs every seven days, I replied. For example, I could begin this post with … Welcome to TVTA’s weekly edition of Non-toy ad Tuesday!

And you would be lying through your teeth, said Wooof, Non-toy ad Tuesday is never weekly. You use the term as loosely as that ill-fitting bright orangeĀ and brown ski-jumper Mrs Coldkettle the tea lady knitted you last Christmas!

Don’t mention that dreadful jumper! I said. Mrs Coldkettle’s heart is in the right place, sadly her taste in knitwear isn’t.

So you admit Non-toy ad Tuesday is not a weekly?

You got me, Wooof. It’s not a weekly.

So what is a weekly then?

Look, why don’t you go and consult your new cat dictionary app you had for Christmas or something, and leave me to get on with posting up the scans?

Fine, said the cat. What are you posting first?

An ad for a French music magazine from 1987.

A weekly?

No. A monthly

šŸ™‚

Also in this week’s issue: Memorex, Wharfedale, VHS, Lemmy, Air France, News Cigarettes, Mitsubishi cars, and a nifty Judge Dredd towelling robe!


France. Pif Gadget. 1987.

France. Pif Gadget. 1987.


France. Charlie Mensuel. 1983.

France. Charlie Mensuel. 1983.


UK. Sky Magazine. 1987.


UK. 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special. 1987.


UK. 2000 AD Sci-Fi Special. 1987.


UK. Starburst. 1984.


US. Time. 1980.

US. Time. 1980.


US. Time. 1980.

US. Time. 1980.


France. Charlie Mensuel. 1983.


Thanks for looking! Join us again soon for another (un-weekly) edition of Non-toy ad Tuesday!

Hey, Ding-A-Ling!

Ding-A-Lings. Not to be confused with: scatterbrains, telephones, Chuck Berry, Ding-A-Ling Dolls, or Dead Deadly Ding-a-Ling the Deranged Clown (currently in prison).

US. Pep. 1972.

Ding-A-Lings are plastic, motorised toy robots made in the early 1970s by North American company Topper. Driven by an interchangeable ‘Ding-A-Lings Power Pack’ each robot was able to perform movements. The colourful line included many characters as well as ‘Ding-A-Lings Space Skyways’ track parts.

For more info on the Ding-A-Lings line check out: TopperdingalingsĀ