Author Archives: The Vintage Toy Advertiser

About The Vintage Toy Advertiser

Love late-20th Century pop culture? Then you’ll love it here! The Vintage Toy Advertiser began life in 2010 as an obscure blog showcasing French toy adverts from the 1970s and 1980s. In 2011 we moved to our current WordPress home and shifted up a few gears to incorporate a more international and wider-reaching flavour. Today, TVTA’s mission and passion is to document and digitally showcase as much vintage advertising as we can get our ink-stained fingers on… from toys, to film, to music, to comics, video games, household goods, food and drink promotions and fashion! We have a scanning room… we have archives… we have an office cat called Wooof! We like to go time-travelling, especially to the 1970s and 80s! We love coffee and chocolate, writers, designers and artists, peace, love, disco, space, nonsense and silliness, magazines, comics and Christmas catalogues. We also love pizza, and movies that go well with pizza! If you like even just one of the aforementioned things then please feel free to join our growing TVTA community of 20th century retro lovers! Thanks for stopping by, Paul Ford. TVTA.

Marvel’s Empire Strikes Back First Issue

I was happy to add this first issue of Marvel’s The Empire Strikes Back from 1980. The UK copy came with a free sheet of Kraft Dairylea action transfers – which was unused and included with the issue I picked up.

Dagobah Bog Planet. Check out the odd-looking Yoda… what’s he pointing at? Why is Luke flying through the air with his back to us? Why so feisty Artoo, has the Dagobah bog water got into your circuits? And what are all those other weird images about? All becomes one with the Force when you take a look at the “How to use your Dairylea action transfers” page inside the comic…

The issue included a page upon which you could rub down your transfers onto a handy Dagobah Bog scene. You could then use ‘crayons’ to colour the rest of the scene. Our family was quite poor, but even we could afford fine-tipped felts. The cumbersome Crayola crayons we owned would surely have destroyed that page in seconds! And… I’m still trying to figure out where ‘flying Luke’ should go in the scene… Perhaps Yoda is ‘finger-Force-pointing’ at him and making him fly? Dammit, being an adult sucks, because I know I wouldn’t have hesitated to Crayola the crap out of that pic after rubbing off every last transfer image from the free sheet with a two-pence piece and sticking them wherever I chose. Take that adult comic collectors (including free gifts) 40 years later!!

Back page advert for Kraft Dairylea action transfers offer. Is the hunt on next for the bumper transfer pack?

Thanks for rubbing down transfers and spreading soft cheese with us! Until next time, mtfbwy! 🙂

Vintage NASA Space Set Made In West Germany

A TVTA mystery toy special! NASA formed in 1958 and West Germany ceased to be in 1990 – so this toy set which I picked up for under a tenner at my local vintage toy shop was produced anywhere between those two dates, likely the late 70s early 80s? The figurines are approx 1 inch tall, and like the lunar module and rocket vehicle have ‘W GERMANY’ stamped on them as COO (Country Of Origin). The red pilot figure has no COO stamp but has the same uniform as the others, and was likely meant for a vehicle that’s missing from the set? I made this quick dio using card, rocks and sand.

Edit: 20/11/17. Thanks to TVTA agent Arohk over on the TIG forum I’ve found out the origins of these toys. Fast forward to the end of this post to find out!


Mystery solved! The figures and “Lunar Set” were originally made by Jean Höfler, with the figures eventually being licensed out to Plong bubblegum in North America. The following images are all courtesy of the excellent site: blechroboter.de

image by blechroboter.de

image by blechroboter.de

Thanks for looking 🙂

Tammy, the doll you love to dress

Advertised as “The Doll You Love To Dress”, Tammy was a 12″ teenage fashion doll produced by Ideal between 1962 and 1966. Tammy was produced in three versions: a straight legs version, a bendable legs version, and a “Grown Up Tammy” version which also featured an African American version. Tammy inspired the UK’s bestselling teenage doll, Sindy, which was released in 1963, one year after Tammy. Pedigree Toys who owned the license for Sindy obtained permission to use Tammy’s tag line, “The Doll You Love To Dress”.

The selected pages below have been scanned from an early Ideal Toys catalogue. The drawings are quite a charm, and the catalogue includes a checklist of what accessories were available at the time and also a price list.














Thanks for looking!

Never mind the adverts Pt10 – Takara Die Cast Darth Vader

Welcome to another Never Mind The Adverts… Here Are The Toys! This time we take a look at the 1978 Die Cast Darth Vader figure made by the Takara company, Japan.

Japanese toy company Takara has never been shy of infusing its love of the quirky into the toys and merchandise it was licensed to produce and distribute for the first Star Wars film. The transforming X Wing Fighter and missile launching R2-D2 are just two examples. It’s no great surprise to see their die cast Darth Vader receiving similar treatment with a ‘robot-look’ makeover, and the issue of not just his trusty lightsaber but a full-on missile-firing crossbow!

Features: This cool die cast Darth Vader measures in at around 7 inches tall (17.78 cm) has articulated legs and arms, and can turn his head to the left and right via a lever located on his back.

Accessories: lightsaber, crossbow, two shots, removable vinyl cape, stand.

Packaging: the partially bilingual box comes with the typical Takara graphics and includes the ST logo belonging to the company responsible for checking the safety standards of the toy. Line drawings on the back of the box indicate the action features. The bottom right insert picture on the back appears to show the C-3PO die cast figure that was released along with Vader.





If you want to discover other cool Japanese vintage Star Wars collectables check out my guide over on The Imperial Gunnery Forum

That’s all for now. Thanks for looking, and join us again soon for another Never Mind The Adverts!


 

Siku – quality die cast toys from Germany

Siku’s origins began in the German town of Ludenscheid in 1921. It was founded by Richard Sieper, a toolmaker working in metals and plastics. Early production items included aluminium cutlery, tools, belt buckles, buttons, military badges and decorations. The company went on to became a leader in the field of thermo-plastics, and in 1950 registered the name SIKU – formed from the first two letters of Sieper, and the first two letters of Kunstoff – the German word for synthetic material or plastic. Adapted from: Siku history

Below are scans taken from a German multi-lingual product catalogue showing the 1980 – 1981 range.


Adverts

UK. Eagle. 1983.


Thanks for looking!

Japanese chirashi mini posters: Gremlins, Robocop, Indiana Jones

Some more classic movies added to the TVTA chirashi poster collection. Here are the scans showing both the front and backs.

Gremlins

Gremlins 2

Robocop

Robocop 2

Robocop 3

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

Thanks for looking 🙂

1980s sci-fi and fantasy merchandise

Back in the eighties if you wanted to get your hands on some cool sci-fi and fantasy merchandise you went to your local comic shop or you sent off for mail order via adverts found in comic books and magazines. The following are a selection of adverts found in US Starlog and UK Starburst publications.

Stores and mail order

US. Starlog. 1984.

UK. Starburst. 1982.

UK. Starburst. 1982.

UK. Starburst. 1982.

US. Starlog. 1980.

UK. Starburst. 1989.

US. Starlog. 1980.

Books and publications

UK. Starburst. 1989.

UK. Starburst. 1989.

US. Starlog. 1983.

US. Starlog. 1980.

UK. Starburst. 1989.

Role Playing

US. Starlog. 1985.

US. Starlog. 1985.

Film and video

UK. Starburst. 1989.

UK. Starburst. 1982.

UK. Starburst. 1988.

Halloween countdown: 1

Part 5 of 5. The Halloween Party

OK CORRAL is a wild west theme park situated near to Marseille, France. Each year for the two-week autumn school holiday they transform the park into a Halloween theme. It was quite a ball for the editor and family… enjoying the darkest and spookiest celebration of the year in the sunshine of sth France!

 

 


Thanks for counting down with us! See you next year for more Halloween fun!