Tag Archives: vintage toys

View-Master stereo images

 Peanuts – Good Grief, Beethoven! 1966


I tried to get some more shots of View-Master images taken by camera direct through a viewer – with varying degrees of success. I managed to get two Peanuts stories without too much blurring, and a whole bunch of random images from Sesame Street, The Flintstones, and The Steadfast Tin Soldier.

As my reel collection grows, it’s my aim to try and capture the best images possible – a lot of trial and error. Well, the following aren’t too shabby, as you can see, but nothing can beat seeing these wonderful 3D images with your own eyes through a View-Master! The modelmaking and photography techniques of certain reels is an absolute joy to behold.

Used to have a View-Master as a kid? Haven’t got one as an adult? What are you waiting for? They’re fairly inexpensive to buy on the second-hand market, and your eyes will thank you greatly 🙂 🙂


Peanuts – Throw it home, Snoopy! 1966


Sesame Street, People in your neighbourhood, 1982


The Steadfast Tin Soldier, Hans Christian Andersen’s Fairy Tales, 1958


Cartoon Favorites, The Flintstones, 1962


Look out for more View-Master goodies coming soon! As always, thanks for looking 🙂

Matchbox Collectors’ Catalogue 1986/87

Presenting scans from the 1986/87 Australian edition of the Matchbox Collectors’ Catalogue.


Gallery 1 – Matchbox 1-75 range

Gallery 2 – Matchbox Convoy Range, Action Sets and Team Matchbox

Gallery 3 – Matchbox Models of Yesteryear

Gallery 4 – Matchbox Junior Collectors’ Club, Matchbox Calendars, Matchbox toys


Thanks for looking 🙂

View-Master reels: Jules Verne’s 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea – 1954.



The following selected scans are of the Gaf View-Master reels and packaging for Jules Verne’s sci-fi classic 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.  

More View-Master goodies can be seen here Thanks for looking 🙂


Reels and packaging images


Slide images

It’s really finicky trying to get images of View-Master slides which are less than an inch in size and more than fifty years old! I tried scanning them at first – to no avail, but ended up with some half-decent camera shots using my trusty Fuji. The set designs and character figures for the narrative are pretty stunning I think.

 


Thanks for looking 🙂 And big thanks to good friend and fellow WP blogger Spira who sent me the above View-Master reel in a recent trade. Please check out Spira’s wonderful art blog inspiration


Bonus TVTA trivia: 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by French writer Jules Verne was originally published in serial format throughout 1869 and 1870. Its first translation into English language occurred in 1873, with many errors in the translation of Verne’s French, including some character changes. The French title – Vingt mille lieues sous les mers  actually means Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas – plural, not Sea singular, and relates to the distance travelled under the sea – 80,000 kilometres, and not the depth. The farthest depth reached as mentioned in the novel is only 4 leagues. The novel’s full French title is Vingt mille lieues sous les mers: Tour du monde sous-marin, “Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Seas: A Tour of the Underwater World”. Translation and character errors occurred up until the 1960s and 1990s when attempts were made to translate the novel faithfully to Verne’s original.

Join us ye brave space cadets…

… as TVTA blasts off into 2019 and gets completely spaced out in the name of all things space!

Stick around! Space Letraset action transfers. 1960s. France.


Dear readers, we invite you to get with the space programme! 

Here are your eight training modules. Good luck space cadets… mission control is counting on you!


Module 1 – Galactic Communication. Space exploration stamps!

Module 2 – Simulations. Learn how to make Nasa space dioramas!

“We come in pieces.” Jean Höfler / Plong Nasa space toys. West Germany. Diorama by TVTA.


Module 3 – Essential Equipment. Space toys!

Module 4 – Construction in Space. The Lego Method!

Module 5 – Video Learning. Space movies!

Module 6 – Uniforms and Kit. Space style!

Module 7 – Know thy moons!

Module 8 – Space nutrition. All you can eat and drink in the vacuum of space!

Congratulations space cadets! You have passed your basic training and can now proceed to mission control to receive your first assignment.

Don’t forget to pick up your free astronaut goodie-bags, space TV wi-fi helmet and alien monkey blaster gifts from Group Captain Buzz Lightyear who will be on hand to answer all your space questions! Cosmic calamities await!

Buzz Lightyear original 90s talking toy. TVTA collection.

Join us again soon as we blast off to Venus in search of chocolate fizzing macaroons and gravity-free Swiss cheese! Happy New year to all our readers, and may much happiness and success come your way! As always, thanks for looking 🙂


 

Curiouser and curiouser… the Bburago HAT Catalogue 1976, starring:

“The Curious Case of the Random, Everyday Objects Superimposed Next to the Cars!”

… and nothing to do with hats, though it is a little mad, Alice…

… mad objects like coins, pasta, moon rocks, pencil shavings, Andorran flag bottle tops, and more! Maybe some of our Italian visitors can help out with the significance of these photographed objects placed next to drawings of cars? Or will they be as nonplussed as us? Non? What’s Italian for ‘no’? The catalogue in question is Italian, a Bburago HAT (Hobbies And Toys) 1976 N°2 edition. Perhaps catalogue N°1 had similar designs? The objects seem to be ‘hobby’ or ‘food’ related? Just how are these everyday items related to toy cars??

So many questions, I know, I know! Let’s move quickly to the scans which show some truly wonderful artwork of the models available by Bburago at the time. As was often typical with 1970s advertising, design teams didn’t photograph their product they hired artists to draw it!


The cover… already you see weird objects, but not so noticeable as the images are tiny…


Inside… it all begins in a quite orderly fashion with a very cool cross section of a die cast car…


And then… Bam! Straight down the rabbit hole… it’s random object time… 

(with bonus FREE pun-and-nonsense commentary from our editing team!!)

1.

… A serious car, serious coinage!

Coins!


2.

Please put the lid back on the toothpaste when you’ve finished brushing your teeth!

Toothpaste lid!


3.

Somebody call me a thimble!

Thimble!


4.

Excuse me, officer, I seem to have lost my marbles!

Marbles!

There are others…

Think I’ve got most of them…

(click images to go bigger)

5 – 22


23.

Bottle tops. The nearest one appears to be the Andorran flag?

Bottle tops!


24.

The pen is mightier than the police car?

Pen nibs!


25.

Back to school. Pencil shavings!

Pencil shavings!

At school, in your pencil case, you were likely to have a cheap, plastic sharpener, red, yellow or blue or something; if you were lucky, you’d have one of those sturdy, metal, technical drawing sharpeners; some had sharpeners that were moulded inside see-through containers into which the shavings could be collected and emptied later; others had novelty promotional sharpeners for cartoon, TV and film characters.

Then there was the ‘beast-of-all-sharpeners’… the one that belonged to the entire class, usually bolted onto the end of the teacher’s desk – a sinister-looking device that could grind down three different-sized pencils at a time, automatic or crank handle-operated, when in motion it sounded like a derailed steam train driven over a cliff by Godzilla, and this monster of a pencil-sharpener, make no mistake, could easily rip off your fingers, and the entire lower arm of some of the smaller pupils!


26.

Decorative beads or tongue-tingling sweets?? No fear, we’re not taste-testing them, they’ve been out of their packaging since 1976!

Decorative beads or tongue-tingling sweets??

Calls down to archives: “Wooof… got some tasty new treats for you to test out, dear cat(muhuhahaha)…”
Wooof: “But you’ve already tested them yourself, dear editor.”
Me: “I have?”
Wooof: “Yes, what do you think it was that I sprinkled on top of your cappuccino this morning?”
Me (going green about the gills): “Uuumph!”


27.

… And finally… a back pages questionnaire, for kids, in Italy, in 1976.


Thanks for identifying random objects with us :) If you know the identity of any of the mystery objects in today's post please let us know in the comments. Likewise, if you have any idea what is going on, about anything at all really, ever, we're here, and we'd like to know too! This post has been brought to you by TVTA random objects and old school schools of old school school stories.