Dabbling in Divination

Sharing this wonderful post by my WP blogging good buddy Wibi of Wibi Wonders!

Wibi Wonders

I was grateful to spot a recent ‘Anatomy of an Artwork’ in the Guardian Guide on ‘The Tower’ from the 1982 “Neuzeit-Tarot” (“New Age Tarot”). It provided some interesting background to the deck I was given in 1984. Initially I used the cards a lot, mainly for others (as one should). Below is the cover of the book that I used to help me make sense of the cards. Please note that the deck in the book is not the Neuzeit one, but the Raider-Waite deck).

photo of cover of a book on interpreting Tarot cards - showing the 2 of pentacles of the Raider-Waite deck

But let’s get back to the Neuzeit, or rather, its creator!

Tarot card from 1982 New Age deck - XVI - The Tower

Walter Wegmüller(February 25, 1937 – March 26, 2020)was aSwisspainterand recording artist. According to the Guardian’s Skye Sherwin: “Wegmüller’s sensibility was steeped in 1960s and 70s counterculture. Of Roma heritage and based in Switzerland, he was an intriguing figure in a local hippy circle that included the acid guru Timothy Leary, in exile…

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1991 Rock Cards by Brokum

Here be rockers!


Iron Maiden


Mötley Crüe


Anthrax


Megadeth


Bon Jovi


Alice Cooper

And a Marvel Alice diversion… why not!

Marvel 50th Premiere. Alice Cooper. Sutton and Austin. 1979.


About Rock Cards

In 1991, the Brokum Trading Card company marketed a collectable set of heavy metal and rock band trading cards and unleashed it to the headbanging public. Cards came in random packs of 13 and featured many famous bands of the 1980s along with some class acts from the 70s. The front of each card showed a full colour photograph of the band or band member, while the back showed an additional photo along with information and stats.

Big thanks to my Canadian mate and fellow WP blogger, Resa, over at Graffiti Lux Art & More who sent me these awesome trading cards. Resa, you rock! \m/


Coming next in our Rock Cards series:

Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, Exodus, Testament, Skid Row, Posion, and more!

1991 Rock Cards by Brokum – Having a big bad hair day!

Rock Cards collectable trading cards by Brokum, 1991.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Rikki Rockett.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Winger.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Bon Jovi.

Big, bad, beautiful hair!

In the 1980s, it was not just movie stars and TV personalities sporting audacious big hair – it was rock and heavy metal musicians too! From Poison to Cinderella to Bon Jovi to Mötley Crüe to The Cure to even Metallica at one point in their career.

This post takes a light-hearted look at some of the boys who weren’t afraid to look like girls. In short, I have nothing but admiration for them. I, too, sported various versions of big hair during my stints with bands throughout the 80s and 90s. Being in a band helped glamorise the glam I was aiming for. It was cool to go shopping for clothes you knew you were going to wear on stage at the weekend. Did I wear makeup? Eyeliner a couple of times – depended what band I was in at the time. Black nail varnish? Hell, yeah, often!

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Alice Cooper.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Jani Lane.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Mick Mars + Queen’s Royal Guard.

Rock Cards by Brokum. 1991. Jon Bon Jovi.

Damage to the environment caused by hair, 80s style

In the 1980s, scientists were making it known about the damage being caused to the ozone layer, attributed in part by harmful chlorofluoro­carbons (CFCs) found in aerosol cans like deodorant, hairspray, spray paint, and even Silly String.

I think the band I was in at the time got through enough cans of Silvikrin and Harmony hairspray we likely contributed to at least half of that hole.

It wasn’t always big hair for me though…

Here we can chart the approximate ‘style’ and ‘bigness’ of my hair throughout the 80s and 90s by comparing it to musicians from Rock Cards!


As for now… I still have hair, luckily, even though there are a fair few patches of grey. Most times it’s cut short at the sides with a spikey mop on top – a bit punky. Bathroom hair days now are only ever short compared to the best part of an hour in older days. Some gel. Wax. Easy. And if it’s a bad hair day… there’s always a hat 🙂

That’s all for now, mates! Join us again soon for more Rock Cards fun, and thank you for doing your hair with us 🙂


About Rock Cards

In 1991, the Brokum Trading Card company marketed a collectable set of heavy metal and rock band trading cards and unleashed it to the headbanging public. Cards came in random packs of 13 and featured many famous bands of the 1980s along with some class acts from the 70s. The front of each card showed a full colour photograph of the band or band member, while the back showed an additional photo along with information and stats.

Big thanks to my Canadian mate and fellow WP blogger, Resa, over at Graffiti Lux Art & More who sent me these awesome trading cards. Resa, you rock! \m/


 

Panini stickers and trading cards

Panini,originally known as ‘Figurine Panini’, is famous for producing collectable stickers and trading cards – notably football stickers from tournaments and leagues around the world. Panini also produce books, comics and magazines.

The company was founded in 1961 in Modena, Italy, by brothers Benito and Giuseppe Panini. In 1963 two other Panini brothers, Franco and Umberto, joined the company. Alongside its popular football albums and stickers, Panini have produced albums and stickers for the likes of Disney, Star Wars, The Smurfs, Barbie, Masters of the Universe, and many other popular titles from film, cartoons and TV shows.

Panini Masters of the Universe. Denmark. 1987.


Panini Barbie. Denmark. 1987.

Figurine Panini Barbie stickers and album offer with Nikki comic. 1985. UK.

Figurine Panini Barbie offer with Nikki comic. 1985. UK.

Panini Candy-Candy. France. 1981.

Panini Capitaine Flam. France.1981.


Panini Football albums and stickers


Official website: Panini


Thank you for trading stickers with us 🙂

A selection of Oracle and Tarot card decks

Inspired by my good blogging friend Aquileana I’m pleased to post up some examples from my collection of divination cards. For many, divination cards like these offer the possibility of inspiration and guidance. They present the user with beautiful and fantastic images found in the often multi-layered artwork, along with a wide range of cultural and spiritual themes. As you will see below, some of my favourite decks are about fairies and Celtic mythology.

Click images to go bigger.

Thanks for looking 🙂 

Faery Wicca Tarot. Kisma K. Stepanich. Illustrated by Renée Christine Yates. 1999, Llewellyn.

The A.E. Waite Tarot. Arthur Edward Waite. Illustrated by Pamela Colman Smith. Originally published in 1910 by Rider.

Medicine Cards. Jamie Sams & David Carson. Illustrated by Angela Werneke.  Renée Christine Yates. 1998/99, St. Martins’ Press.

The Faeries’ Oracle. Brian Froud and Jessica Macbeth. 2000, Simon & Schuster.

The Fairy Pack. Claire Nahmad. Illustrated by Danuta Mayer. 2003. Godsfield Press Ltd.

Goddess Guidance Oracle Cards. Doreen Virtue, PH.D. 2002, Hay House Inc.

Artists. Row 1: Kali and Yemanya by Lisa Iris. Sarasvati by Sue Halstenberg.

Artists. Row 2: Aeracura and Athena by Elizabeth Kyle. Freyja by Lisa Iris.

Artists. Row 3: Aphrodite by Sharon George. Ixchel by Lisa Iris. Ostara by Wendy Andrew.

The Celtic Animal Oracle. Anna Franklin. Illustrated by Paul Mason. 2003, Vega.


The above images feature box art and selected cards of individual sets from my collection. They have been scanned into this article to provide examples of just a fraction of the wide range of divination cards that are available. No infringement of copyright to the original publishers, writers and artists is intended. Please check out Aquileana‘s excellent overview of the Major and Minor Arcana cards if you are interested in further reading about the Tarot.

I need gorilla info – fast!

So I’ll just go check my preferred search engine of choice.

But back in pre-internet days, if I wanted to find out about gorillas, or leopards, or Indian elephants, I had to work for it. It usually involved a trip to the local or school library, or consultation with the hefty family encylopedia that was so heavy it required two people to lift it from the  bookshelf, or questions aimed at one of my more brainier friends or relatives. Or else, if I’d have known they’d existed in 1980-something or so, I could have collected Animal Cards!

Animal Cards. This four page UK promotional leaflet from Heron Books came inside a copy of Star wars Weekly from 1980. Readers were invited to become subscribers and receive card sets and a filing case in which to store them. The cards were printed with colour photographs, facts and information, and contained four different ways of filing classification depending on your favourite category. The promotional leaflet contains a written endorsement from the World Wildlife Fund.


Click me to make bigger.


Thanks for stopping by  🙂


In other gorilla news…

US. Weird War Tals. 1974.

France. Pif Gadget. 1983.

UK. Planet of the Apes and Dracula Lives. #94. 1976.

1975 Penguin UK edition of Planet of the Apes by Pierre Boulle.

US. The Defenders. 1977.

This just in …

Netherlands. 1983.