More Fantastic Superhero Goodies

Vintage Superhero Toys and Merchandise Galore. Part 2. Courtesy of The Superhero Book of Goodies, issue 2, 1977.

TVTA’s previous post, part one, is here

In part two we look at clothing and household goods. From T-shirts to toothbrushes, flashlights to wrist radios, beach towels to bean bags, belts, bedding, school supplies, puzzles and much more!


Your Favourite Stars and Heroes On T-Shirts

Poster Parade

Beach Towels

Bean Bags and Bedding

Belts and Rings

Marvel Mood Rings and Batman Talking Alarm Clock

Sensational Socks and Star-Studded Sweat-Shirts

Super School Supplies

Comic Book Savers, Enforcer Sets, Ghost Rider Stunt Cycle and Marvel Banks

Superhero Puzzles


Look out for the third and final part of this series coming soon, in which we take a look at a few goodies from the Mego corporation. As always, thanks for looking 🙂

Sources: The Superhero Book of Goodies Issue 2, 1977, scanned by TVTA.

Predictive text – it’s no picnic

‘Why are you looking so perplexed?’ Wooof asked me this morning during my third cup of coffee.

‘It’s that predictive text thingy,’ I said.

‘Oh?’

‘Well, it never works. For example, I’ve been researching for a big writing piece I’m working on. I tried to enter into my search engine: “Public Inquiries of the Twentieth Century” … and do you know what it predicted?’

‘What?’

‘”Picnic Injuries of the Twentieth Century”, that’s what!’

‘Ha-ha,’ laughed the cat. ‘I suppose that might involve trapped fingers inside hampers, wasp stings, napkin cuts, champagne corks in the eye.’

‘It’s pretty serious stuff when you look into it. Perhaps we ought to warn our readers?’

‘We should,’ agreed the cat. ‘Summer’s only around the corner. Soon there’ll be chequered blankets and condiments everywhere! How are we to keep the good folk of Vintage-land safe?’

‘By launching our very own public service picnic ad campaign!’ I said.

‘Are you serious?’

‘Sometimes.’

‘Alright,’ said the cat. ‘Let’s do it!’


INTRODUCING 

TVTA’s Summertime Safe Picnic Initiative is proudly sponsored by Badgerworth’s Wasp-catcher Kettles and Foxes & Fangles Mind That Bear Exploding Monkeys.



Ask The Family! 

We asked 1960’s Tammy’s family for their top Dos and Don’ts when it comes to enjoying a safe picnic in style.


The right look, the safe look!

Tammy: “It’s important for me to look my best at all times. But when it comes to picnics… skiing, roller skates and archery are huge no-go areas. Don’t be tempted by the latest fads or what your friends might say. It’s just not worth the risk!”

 

Below: Good show Tammy, that’s the safe way to picnic and you still look stylish!


Don’t be a square, daddy-o!

Ted and Dad are taking big risks by wearing such formal and warm attire to the picnic. 27% of picnic fatalities are caused by heat exposure and the rapid onset of mindless delirium. In severe cases the over-heated picnicker may resort to heinous criminal activity. 

Below: That’s better lads!


Stay cool, but never be underdressed!

Blimey Mom, watch out for your skin! More than 32% of picnic fatalities are caused by deadly insects attracted to human flesh. In addition, serious sunburn injuries can occur within just minutes of exposing bare arms and legs on the picnic blanket. Don’t risk it. Cover up sensibly. Mom looks great for a woman her age, let’s keep her that way!


Keep an eye on children at all times!

More than 47% of picnic fatalities arise from children being taken offsite by wild bears, mountain lions, Komodo dragons and in rare cases sharks.

Be seen!

Tammy’s younger sister Pepper says: “When I was very young I had to stay at home during family picnics. Understandable. The risk was too great. Now I’m older I wear the latest, brightest and fashionable clothing so that my family can easily spot me. Bright colours can also act as a deterrent to killer animals. Don’t forget to accessorise with glitter and jewellery to make you really stand out! Visibility coupled with style is key. How else will your family be able to find you as wild creatures drag you screaming into the woods by your bleeding hair follicles and…  

… alright Pepper that’s enough, we get the idea. Stop freaking us out! 

Picnic on dudes!

So dear reader, this summer, be safe, be seen, be stylish, and most importantly enjoy your picnic adventures!

 


Editor’s note: If you would like to find out more about Tammy’s family then please take a look at our excellent Tammy catalogue pages here

And Wooof, please change the site logo back to how it was!

Fast Cars, Key Chains and Cop Show Guns

Courtesy of the 1976 Pilen catalogue from Spain 

Pilen S.A. was a Spanish company that produced die cast model cars, key chains and toy guns. TVTA is pleased to present the full scans from this terrific little catalogue printed in Spanish, French, English and German. Featuring international model cars, a Tiger tank, toy guns from top cop shows like Kojak, Columbo and The Untouchables, and somewhat randomly… a set of child’s kitchen scales. It’s all here. And how about those front and back covers… with what looks like a De Tomasa Mangusta launching itself through a set of tyres against a deep red background. Always good to see some art on the covers of a catalogue.  

The cars

While many of Pilen’s models are considered recasts of Dinky, Corgi, Solido and Polistil, see here and here, Pilen nevertheless stamped their own identity on them by producing superb vehicles made of quality materials, with attractive paint apps and working features.   









Tiger Tanks


Guns N’ Wrenches

Pilen produced some cool toy guns, managing to snag licenses for big name 60s and 70s TV shows like Kojak, Columbo, Matt Helm, U.S. Marshal, Cannon, Get Smart, and The Untouchables. Pilen key chains featured various mini tools like wrenches, saws, hammers, and even a pistol. I had one of the key chain tools as a kid and I’m almost certain it had working features. According to Wikipedia the key chains were already in production by Pilen long before the company began selling cars. Included with each car purchase was a mini catalogue with a slip which could be cut out and collected then used to send off for a free key chain. 






On balance …

I don’t know why the child’s kitchen scales are included on the last page… maybe it was an end of line sale, or just a space-filler, or the company testing the market for the launch of a line of die cast super kitchen accessories? Here at TVTA we never mind a little speculation, and are always happy to end a post with a kitchen unit or accessory 🙂


 

Vintage Superhero Toys and Merchandise Galore …

… courtesy of The Superhero Book of Goodies catalogue, issue 2, 1977, with cover drawn by Joe Kubert.

The Superhero Book of Goodies was the colourful product catalogue for Ivan Snyder’s New Jersey-based mail order and retail store company Superhero Enterprises, later known as Heroes World. The company was a leading US comic book and merchandise distributor from 1975 until its demise in 1997 following its buy-out by Marvel comics.

We don’t need another hero

The catalogues featured the company’s very own superhero mascot – ‘Our Superhero’, sometimes referred to as ‘Snyderman’, and were produced in conjunction with Joe Kubert’s School of Cartoon and Graphic Art

Some famous comic book names below that were former students. But can you spot the future famous TV zombie holocaust survivor?

Name the Superhero contest … did this happen?

So was he called Our Hero or Snyderman? If not then what name? Who won the competition? Did issue 3 tell us? Do you have issue 3? Can you enlighten us? Argh, so many questions!

As well as handling Marvel and DC products, the company advertised a small range of goods for film and TV franchises such as Star Trek, Star Wars, Space 1999, Planet of the Apes, The Bionic Woman, The Six-Million Dollar Man and others. As seen by just the handful of scans we’ve taken from issue 2 so far, the catalogues – and not forgetting the numerous full page adverts found across hundreds of comic titles, feature a range of items from toys to household goods to stamps, stationery, badges, patches, clothing, posters, books and comics and much more. Let’s take a look at some, as TVTA enters the delightful and colourful world of The Superhero Book of Goodies…


Spidey Utility Belt, Superman Postcards, Marvel and DC Superbaby Rag Dolls

Mego Super-Heroes

Have yourself a Rock Party! 

Marvel and DC stamps, Star Trek goodies

Super-Friends Hall of Justice play set, Wonder Woman toys

Superhero Shooters and Shields

More shields and Ricochet Racers Spider-Man set

Enter the World of Marvel

Superhero Mirrors

Batman toys

Batman Grappling Hook, Batman Bat Plane with Launcher, Batman Corgi toys

Board Games, Painting and View Master

Marvel Dart Board, Spidey Squirt Gun, Spidey Plane

Patches

And lastly, badges


Part 2 to come soon, featuring more Superhero goodies. Thanks for looking  🙂

Sources: The Kubert School. Wikipedia. Gone and Forgotten. Consulted 12/05/18, and The Superhero Book of Goodies Issue 2, 1977 scanned by TVTA.

IDEA 170 – Japanese magazine of international graphic art (pt1)

Idea 170. 1982. Cover. Stephan Kantscheff.

IDEA is a Japanese / English language magazine that focuses on graphic design and typography. Published quarterly in Tokyo, Japan, its first issue was in 1953. The following scans are from issue 170 published for 1982 and feature artworks by the designers Stephan Kantscheff, Jim Heimann, Jacques Poirier, Jacques Richez and Yōji Yamamoto. 


Stephan Kantscheff (Bulgaria)

Stephan Kantscheff book cover for the Bulgarian folk-tales.

Stephan Kantscheff. Magazine cover for ‘Neue Werburg’.

Stephan Kantscheff. Greeting cards designs.

Stephan Kantscheff design for Bulgarian TV and Radio Broadcasting Committee.

Stephan Kantscheff design for programmes in colour for Bulgarian Television.

Stephan Kantscheff design for programmes in colour for Bulgarian Television.

Stephan Kantscheff designs for postage stamps.

Stephan Kantscheff design for a postage stamp.

Stephan Kantscheff design for a postage stamp.


Jim Heimann (US)

Jim Heimann postcard design for retail store Heaven.

Jim Heimann illustrated cards.

Jim Heimann.

Jim Heimann magazine illustration for an article “Women’s Movement”.


Jacques Poirier (France)

Jacques Poirier. L to R – illustration for an article “Intermission” for Pilote magazine. Portrait of Louis Armstrong for Phosphore magazine. Illustration for an article “Toreador”. Cover illustration for Vie Publique Journal.

Jacques Poirier. L to R – cover for Nourriture Dietetique Magazine. Illustration for an article “Excentric Millionaire”. “Personal research produced to please the author’s daughter”.


Jacques Richez (France)

Jacques Richez. Colour trap. Drawing, photo, relief colour.

Jacques Richez. Colour trap. ID.


Yōji Yamamoto (Japan)

Yoji Yamamoto original work for Typographical Image Exhibition, the character “River”.

Yoji Yamamoto designs.


Thanks for looking. More images from Idea 170 coming soon.

Image sources: Idea 170, 1982. Copyright Idea. Scanned by The Vintage Toy Advertiser for information and research purposes.

Poem – The fisher and the sun

 

This fisher has had far too much sun.

Nowhere to sit, she stands on her raft which is a thin broken biscuit

Floating on the tea of the sea. 

The sun weighs down on her head like an iron press,

With nothing else better to do than to squeeze and burn her.

It claimed the colour from her hair long ago.

Turned her arms into dangling crisp bacon.

Turned her shoulders into bronze epaulettes of no rank or division.

Made her thin, her pot belly as hard as a pumpkin,

Her legs as stringy and black as liquorice sticks,

And skin so leathery you could line writing desks with it.

But every day she still went out – this fisher –

Waiting for her rod to twitch with fish so that she could return to her village the hero.

The sun waited with her. Patient and simmering,

As time and skin blistered, peeled, repaired, repeated, went raw again.

 

Then one morning …

Hoy! Her rod bends into an arc,

A bamboo rainbow between the raft and the sea.

The line goes TWANG and the surface ripples, froths, is ready to spew.

Quick to react she seizes the rod and bends her back,

Her bacon-y arms now taught and rippling with willing muscle,

Her shoelace legs like steel anchors fusing feet to raft.

She sucks in her belly, her abdominals are cubes of frozen tuna

Lined up on a chopping board, her sweat coming fast, wetting, glossing her,

Making her marble, a statue, a goddess, a hunter of the sea.

The sun becomes interested and pours heat on her like a furious kiln.

She ignores its spiteful baiting and struggles on with the fish.

Then her eyes bulge as the water breaks, and a shark erupts from the cold depths

Like a pale blue missile which lands on the raft with a boom that almost sinks her.

It writhes there for a moment, flipping and flopping, its teeth bared savagely,

A single black pupil throbbing in its socket that nails her to that bobbing drift of wood.

Exhausted, she watches the shark die. Her arms turn back to bacon, her legs to jelly.

Her belly pops out like a seed from a pod.

 

The sun is impressed and immediately sets about boiling her sweat…

But she’s seen too much of this cruel sun, has this fisher,

And she looks up at that moody blood orange in the sky and says:

Here, sun, see what I’ve done! A fish taken from its cold city,

And placed before the sky on a matchstick boat.

I ask you, oh mighty you, could you do this?

And the sun thinks could I? Should I?

A pensive sun. Enjoying this unexpected inquisition.

Then it blinks and has to close its eyes,

As an enormous white cloud chugs slowly by.

Time. Stilled for a while. Clouds are not to be hurried the elders say.

And when later the sky breaks and the sun looks again,

The fisher, the raft and the shark have all gone.

And the sun, deceived, vows to furiously torch all the gulls in the sky

That have the audacity to fly above the wake of the fisher

Who has long since moored her raft and summoned the children

To help drag the shark across the beach

For butchering up for the night of the feast.

The cool night that comes to put suns to sleep.

 


Words by the editor.


 

Happy Star Wars Day

May The Fourth Be With You!

Star Wars Weekly. 1978.

This year TVTA encourages you to fill those blank spaces on your 1970s bedroom wall by cutting out your free pin-ups – courtesy of those nice Marvel artists at British publication Star Wars Weekly (time machine, bedroom wall, pocket money and newsagents required).

Star Wars Weekly was a UK Marvel comic run which covered the original trilogy films during the late 70s and early 80s. The comics featured Star Wars and non-Star Wars stories, competitions, articles, and in some issues a pin-up poster known as an Action Pin-up, Collector’s Pin-up, or Pin-Up Special.

The following are scans of the pin-ups I found in my pile. Happy Star Wars Day 🙂

Star Wars Weekly. 1978.

Star Wars Weekly. 1979.

Star Wars Weekly. 1978.

Star Wars Weekly. 1978.

Star Wars Weekly. 1978.

Star Wars Weekly. 1978.

Star Wars Weekly. 1978.

While I don’t have a complete collection of Star Wars Weekly, the pin-ups featured in early copies of the series all seem to be drawings. By the time The Empire Strikes Back made it to publication the art pin-ups look to have been replaced by photographs. I don’t have any of the Return of the Jedi series yet so can’t comment if art or photos were used during that run.   

Star Wars Weekly. The Empire Strikes Back. 1980.


That’s all for this year. I’ll add more pin-ups as and when I find them. Thank you for covering over hideous 70s bedroom wallpaper patterns with us 🙂


This post is a sushi-free post.

Hee hee, actually it’s not. May The Sushi also Be With You!

Photo and creation by the talented Mr Oki


 

 

Power Rangers Toys and Merchandise

Following yesterday’s big toy news story of Hasbro acquiring the Power Rangers franchise for $522 million, The Vintage Toy Advertiser is pleased to welcome the Rangers to our categories in what we hope will be a growing selection of toy and merchandise ads that have covered the franchise over the past twenty five years. We actually had this post prepped up in our editing suite last weekend for an upcoming publication (we were holding out on a few incoming ads), but are thrilled to ‘power up’ and publish it today on the back of the Hasbro announcement. Go go go …

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers

Power Rangers is an American superhero TV and film franchise adapted from the Japanese series Super Sentai. The first Power Rangers TV series was Mighty Morphin Power Rangers with its debut broadcast in 1993. The show became a huge success and spawned a long line of toys, video games, books, comics and other merchandise. To date three films have been released in 1995, 1997 and 2017. TVTA is pleased to present a selection of toy and merchandise ads that have covered the franchise.

Ets de Neuter. 1995. France.

Ets de Neuter. 1995. France.

Ets de Neuter. 1995. France.

Ets de Neuter. 1995. France.

Ets de Neuter. 1995. France.

Ets de Neuter. 1995. France.

Ets de Neuter. 1995. France.

Ets de Neuter. 1995. France.