Tag Archives: toys

Tintin, toy cars, bionics & a Bat horn!

New additions fresh from the scanner! Enjoy 🙂

Tintin L’affaire Tournasol. Enamel advert. Date unknown.

Tintin Adventure Club. 1986. Sweden.

Tintin Adventure Club. 1986. Sweden.

Aurora AFX. 1973. US.

Matchbox Super 6. 1976. US.

Siku. 1986. Sweden.

Six Million Dollar Man. 1976. US.

Barbie Yellow Booklet. 1962. US.

Batman Bike Horn. 1977. US.

Captain America Turbo Motorcycle. 1985. Super-Jouet. France.

Télécran / Etch-a-Sketch. France.

Galaxy Rangers. 1988. UK.

Lego Space. 1979. Sweden.


Thanks for looking 🙂

The Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture Kit

Probably my new favourite print advert!

As regular readers know I’m a bit of a fan of Halloween, and I was going to save this beauty for the Big Day… however, the advert is simply too cool not to share right now!

Enjoy 🙂

The Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture Kit

Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture. 1976 print advert. US.

Endorsed by horror legend Vincent Price (I love the line: ‘Look for Vincent Price’s pretty face on the cover’), the Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture was a kit enablng you to decorate and bake apples in the form of nightmarish shrunken heads! Accessories included a baking capsule (The Shrinker) which you heated using a 40 watt common household light bulb , hair, beads, templates for carving facial features, cord, a paint brush, and a carving tool.

The artwork for my 1976 print advert was created by Mort Drucker, a long time contributor to Mad Magazine. The Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture was produced by Crafts By Whiting, a Milton Bradley Company.

Detail from 1976 Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture print advert.


TVTA bonus trivia!

As well as the Shrunken Head Apple Sculpture Kit, Vincent Price was hired by Milton Bradley to appear in advertising campaigns for two of their other popular products: the games Hangman and Stay Alive.

That’s all for now, vintage mates. Thank you for shrinking fruit with us 🙂

Mutant Green Blob and the Green Machine

Today’s post title sounds like a cool name for some 70s experimental psychedelic rock band. No. The Mutant Green Blob is one of those gunge/slime toys that were all the rage in the 1980s and 90s, and The Green Machine is a pretty cool-looking three wheel low rider child’s bike from 1976. OK Mutant, show us what you can do!

Hale’s Mutant Green Blob gunge toy. 1988. UK.


It’s the hottest ride in town…

The Green Machine by Marx Toys. 1976. US.


Thanks for looking 🙂

Western Models – quality hand-built model cars

Western Models 1982 catalogue poster. Artwork by K. Williams.

Founded in the UK in 1973 by husband and wife team Mike and Joyce Stephens, Western Models produced a range of white-metal casted cars both in kit form and fully finished. Their high quality models were aimed at collectors and enthusiasts, and were typically hand-built from a lead-based white metal. Some vehicles were produced in extremely limited quantities of as little as one-thousand per model, making them highly sought after at the time. Models such as the F1 range and racing cars were specially licensed and built with the co-operation of the racing teams of the day.

Western Models continues to exist to date though it now focuses on producing model aircraft. The following scans are from the 1982 and 1983 poster catalogues, and feature the typical 1:43rd scale vehicle range available at the time, along with its newest innovation line of 1:24th scale vehicles featuring ‘authentic wire like wheels’, or ‘realistic photo-etched wheels’ – often referred to as the ‘Small Wheels’ models.

I’ve never owned a Western Models car but would certainly like to! Looking at the images in the two catalogues you can see the amount of detail, care and attention that went into making these top quality models.

Enjoy the scans.




Information taken from the Western Models poster catalogues 1982 and 1983 – purchased and scanned by TVTA, the company website Western Models, and the Western Models Wikipedia page

As always, thanks for looking 🙂

Construx by Fisher Price

Construx. Speelboom, Netherlands.

Some of you may know of the recent Mega Construx building sets by Mattel, featuring well-known franchise entities like Masters of the Universe, Pokémon, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Monster High, Call of Duty and more. But did you know that Mega Construx has its origins dating back to the early 1980s when it was owned by Fisher-Price and known simply as Construx?

Construx. Speelboom, Netherlands.

The original Construx sets can be comparable to Lego, especially Lego Technic sets, in that creations could be built from a choice of interlocking and movable parts. Sets came with large-size beams that acted as frameworks; these were connected to smaller pieces by connector blocks. Hinges, motors, wheels, pulleys and figures added to the build and play experience.

Construx. Speelboom, Netherlands.

Construx production appears to have ended around 1988, with Mattel (current owners of Mega Brands, including Mega Bloks) re-imagining the line for their Mega Construx sets in 2017. When making my research for this post, an overiding sentiment I found among the original owners of Fisher-Price Construx was that it was one of the best construction sets of its time – even better than Lego, with many agreeing it was a toy limited only by the imagination of the builder.

Construx. Speelboom, Netherlands.


The following images come from 1986 and 87 Dutch catalogues, when the brand was heavily geared to space and action themes.

Construx. De Speelboom, 1987. Netherlands.

Construx. Intertoys Speelboek, 1987. Netherlands

Construx. Speelboom Club Journal N°4, 1986. Netherlands.

Construx. Speelboom Club Journal N°4, 1987. Netherlands.


Thank you for connecting and interlocking with us 🙂

Starriors by Tomy


Big thanks to fellow WP blogger Virtuanaut for sharing the image scans from the Starriors Marvel mini-comics series. To view the complete series be sure to visit Virtuanaut’s site.

Starriors was a short-lived line of toy robots made by Tomy in 1984 and 1985. The figures were released with Marvel mini-comics (6 comics in total). Marvel also published a 4-issue comic book series. Some of the Starriors toys were later altered and re-branded for European markets as R.A.T.S (Robot Anti-Terror Squad).


Starriors toy ad. 1984. Image scan by virtuanaut.net

Starriors toy ad. 1984. Image scan by virtuanaut.net



Thanks for looking 🙂

View-Master / Matchbox Grand Prix Game

Greetings vintage mates. Check out fellow WP blogger Mike Pigott’s excellent die cast toys and models site. The following reblog ticks three boxes of some of my favourite toys: the View-Master, die cast cars, and board games 🙂

Mike Pigott's Diecast Toys & Models

Mike Pigott looks at a rare game that combines a board, a View-Master viewer and reels and four Matchbox Superfast cars.

Viewmaster Game BoardDuring the 1970s GAF, the manufacturer of View-Master, entered the toy market with a range of games incorporating 3D viewers and reels. One of these was a race game that had the novel idea of using Matchbox cars as playing pieces. What makes this product of interest is the fact that some of the cars included were exclusive to the set and were not available separately, resulting in them being among the rarest Matchbox models of all time.

View original post 1,527 more words

G.I. JOE Action Figures 1960s

“America’s Movable Fighting Man”

G.I. Joe was first marketed by Hasbro in 1964 as a 12 inch (30 cm) scale posable action figure, then later again in 1982 as a 3.75 inch (9.5 cm) scale figure. In the UK the toy was sold by the Palitoy company as ‘Action Man’ (12 inch) and ‘Action Force’ (3.75 inch).

TVTA is pleased to present scans for G.I. Joe figures, clothing, accessories and vehicles from the 1964 and 1965 Hasbro catalogues, the G.I. Joe Army Manual, and the G.I. Joe Club.


G.I. Joe product catalogue. 1964.

G.I. Joe product catalogue. 1964.

G.I. Joe product catalogue. 1964.


 G.I. Joe Official Gear and Equipment Manual. 1965.




G.I. Joe Army Manual. 1964.



G.I. Joe Club and used sticker sheet. Dates unknown.



Thanks for looking 🙂