A random selection of jigsaw puzzles published in the 1970s to present

Vintage advert: Mousline Instant Mashed Potato Jigsaw Puzzle Promotion. 1979. France.

Greetings vintage mates. Presenting, a random selection of jigsaw puzzles direct from the collection of TVTA. The first (below) is Disney’s The Rescuers, produced by Nathan in 1978. The completed 12-piece puzzle measures 108 cm long (approx 42 inches) and runs almost the entire length of my editing desk.

Puzzle-Frise. Bernard et Bianca / The Rescuers. 12 Large Piece Puzzle. 1978. Nathan. France.

Below: an early-school puzzle featuring farm-themed figures and objects, with six images to complete.

Silhouettes. 6 puzzles. 1979. Ravensburger. Made in Spain.

Below: Three Star wars puzzles. The first two are 1978 Kenner original-trilogy puzzles, with the “Luke and Droids” version unopened and still sealed. The third is a Hasbro Episodes I to VI puzzle.

Star Wars Luke and Droids 140 piece Jigsaw Puzzle. 1977. Kenner. US.
Star Wars Spave Battle 500 piece Jigsaw Puzzle.1977. Kenner. US.
Star Wars Episodes I to VI 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle. 2015. Ravensburger. Made in Germany.

Where’s Wally? / Ou est Charlie?

The famous striped jersey and beanie hat-wearing elusive Wally is known as ‘Charlie’ here in France.

Ou Est Charlie? / Where’s Wally? 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle from Nathan under license by Ravensburger.
A detailed image for those wishing to find Wally… click pic to enlarge.

Below: Disney scenes 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle. 2010. Ravensburger. Made in Germany.

Disney scenes 500 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle. 2010. Ravensburger. Made in Germany.

Below: Mr Men and Little Miss 45 piece puzzle.

Mr Men and Little Miss 45 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle. 2010. MB Puzzles. France.

Below: Looney Tunes Dance 48 Piece Jigsaw Puzzle and poster. McDonald’s promotion. 2022. Pirouette Cacahouette. France.


As always, thanks for looking!

Do toys prove to be a better investment than gold, art, and financial securities?

Lego Space. Denmark. 1987. TVTA/Jaltesorensen.

Depending on condition, rarity and market demand, I would say yes, they could do. A study published December 3, 2021 by HSE University economists states that “Unusual ways of investment, such as collecting toys, can generate high returns.” One of the study’s authors, Victoria Dobrynskaya, says:

“We are used to thinking that people buy such items as jewellery, antiques or artworks as an investment. However, there are other options, such as collectible toys. Tens of thousands of deals are made on the secondary LEGO market. Even taking into account the small prices of most sets, this is a huge market that is not well-known by traditional investors.” 

Read the HSE article here

Lego sets various. Autumn Bargains catalogue. 1986. UK. TVTA.

Time to break out your old Lego to see if you have anything of value to sell?

Hold on… to gain maximum profit you must first have something that is still in its original sealed box and in mint condition. Second, it needs to be an item that was popular and sought after (think Star Wars Lego sets) and produced as a limited run or as a special exclusive. Third, does the item have nostalgia and worldwide appeal value?

This is not to say that if you have a well-looked after complete Lego set which has been opened and played with, and with the original box and instructions still lying around somewhere, you won’t get a good return on what you originally paid. If you have just the complete Lego toy but no box and instructions however, then your return will be lower.

May The Toys Be With You

Star Wars 1978 Display Stand with First Twelve action figures. TVTA.

The same can be said for Star Wars toys and collectables made between 1978 to around 1985. Some items in mint and unopened condition can go for thousands+, but so too can certain items that are no longer packaged and perhaps not even in that good condition. Rarity is key. In 2010, I paid 100 USD for an all original 1978 Star Wars Display Stand including the ‘first twelve’ figures meant to be displayed. I’ve since updated some of the figures with better condition and rarer specimens (thus increasing its value). The figure accessories are all original and some are very hard to find. If I sold the set today I would make a mouth-watering profit on that original hundred bucks I spent.

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TVTA is retiring (or was that just a hiatus?)

Greetings vintage mates.

It is with a degree of sadness yet a positivity for the future of my blogging endeavours that I am announcing the retirement of The Vintage Toy Advertiser. At the least it will be a hiatus or very long holiday.

Since 2011 my aim for the site was to create an online resource and archive showcasing vintage advertising and catalogue images spanning the subject of toys, movies, comics, video games, food & drink and much more!

Ten years on – I think I’ve largely done as much as I can and want to do for the time being regarding this. The decision has been made easier by my dissatisfaction with the WordPress drive of switching to blocks. As a paying customer I am no longer willing to part with money for a service which does not meet the needs of TVTA.

My archive (4.5K advert and catalogue images + hundreds of toy images from my own collection + hundreds of comic book and magazine covers) was always meant to be added to and enhanced. Having to edit with blocks is unwieldy and time-consuming to maintain the good standards of my work, and it seems there are far too many hoops to have to jump through just to publish even a simple post these days… when blogging should be easy, quick, and fit for everyone’s purpose?

Another issue is that I will soon reach my current plan limit for image space, requiring me to upgrade to the next and more expensive plan with additional features I do not need. Maybe WP could consider offering one-off extra image space packages for blogs which are picture heavy? I doubt that. As much as I’ve always loved WP, they never seem to listen.

So, onto the future…

I will be launching a new site soon. Likely on WP still, but without the costs I’ve been incurring. The site will be simple. Focussed on writing, art projects, and with the occasional feature on vintage books and comics.

As such, The Vintage Toy Advertiser will no longer be updated, and will be left in the capable paws of TVTA office cat extraordinaire Wooof to curate while he idly munches his way through cat biscuits and re-watches all those VHS films we never returned to Blockbusters.

As for my dear vintage mates here… I intend to very much keep in touch, and I would like to give a HUGE, huge, huge, massive, storming, magnificent, mammoth, mega-big thanks to everyone who has been a part of TVTA over these past ten years. The interaction, inspiration, encouragement, fun and laughs, likes, comments, reblogs, shares and links has quite simply made my days 😊

It’s April, and April is my big TVTA blog anniversary – 10 years old this month! And now a retirement to add to it. Sometimes these things work this way.

I’ll leave you with a quick gallery of a few of my favourite archived images over the years (too many to choose from!!), and I’ll be sure to post the link soon for my new site once it’s up and running.

Adios you lovelies, see you on the other side! 😎

Ford, editor TVTA



As always, thanks for looking 🙂

Corgi Toys die-cast vehicles catalogue 1971/72

Q: What do The Magic Roundabout; Popeye; Noddy; Batman; James Bond, The Saint, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and Daktari have in common?

A: They’ve all had die-cast vehicles made for them by Corgi!

TVTA is pleased to present scans from the 1971/72 Corgi Toys catalogue French edition, featuring well-known stars of TV and film, as well as iconic Corgi models like the Lunar Bug and Simon Snorkel fire engine.

Enjoy 🙂


James Bond Aston Martin DB5; Batmobile and Batboat; Chitty Chitty Bang Bang


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