Tag Archives: retro toys

Latest toy ads just in

TIMELINE: 1978, 1979, 1980, 1982, 1985. TOYS: DC Superhero cars, Golden Girl action figures, Karl May action figures, MOTU merchandise, Die Cast cars, Playmobil figures. MANUFACTURERS: Corgi, Mattel, Siso-Trend, Bburago, Inventive Concepts. COUNTRIES: US, Germany, Netherlands.

US. Weird War Tales. 1980.

Germany. 1985.

Germany. 1978.

Germany. 1982.

Germany. 1982.

US. Weird War Tales. 1980.

US. Weird War Tales. 1980.

Netherlands. 1979.

Trash Bag Bunch by Galoob

Trash Bag Bunch was a line of toy figures released by Galoob in 1992. The ingenious gimmick with these toys was that they came in special ‘garbage bags’ and you couldn’t see which figure you were purchasing until you got home and immersed the bags in water. The bags would then fizz and dissolve to reveal your figure.

There were 36 figures to collect – 18 Disposers (the good guys) = the filth-fighters standing for all that is clean, and 18 Trashors (the bad guys) = evil dump dwellers fighting dirty and mean. Figures included monsters, robots and alien creatures.

A Grip ‘n Dip Bagger playset was also released in 1992. Essentially a hand-operated crane enabling you to re-bag your trash figures.

The pictures below are from the 1992 Galoob trade catalogue. Click to enhance.

Trash Bag Bunch. Galoob catalogue. 1992.

Trash Bag Bunch. Galoob catalogue. 1992. Bad guy Trashors.

Trash Bag Bunch. Galoob catalogue. 1992. Good guy Disposers.

Trash Bag Bunch. Galoob catalogue. 1992. Grip ‘n Dip Bagger playset.

G.I. Joe 1986 Catalogue

Hasbro’s awesome line of G.I. Joe 3.75 inch action figures, vehicles and playsets as seen in this 1986 mini catalogue. Click images to enlarge.

Never mind the adverts Pt10 – Takara Die Cast Darth Vader

Welcome to another Never Mind The Adverts… Here Are The Toys! This time we take a look at the 1978 Die Cast Darth Vader figure made by the Takara company, Japan.

Japanese toy company Takara has never been shy of infusing its love of the quirky into the toys and merchandise it was licensed to produce and distribute for the first Star Wars film. The transforming X Wing Fighter and missile launching R2-D2 are just two examples. It’s no great surprise to see their die cast Darth Vader receiving similar treatment with a ‘robot-look’ makeover, and the issue of not just his trusty lightsaber but a full-on missile-firing crossbow!

Features: This cool die cast Darth Vader measures in at around 7 inches tall (17.78 cm) has articulated legs and arms, and can turn his head to the left and right via a lever located on his back.

Accessories: lightsaber, crossbow, two shots, removable vinyl cape, stand.

Packaging: the partially bilingual box comes with the typical Takara graphics and includes the ST logo belonging to the company responsible for checking the safety standards of the toy. Line drawings on the back of the box indicate the action features. The bottom right insert picture on the back appears to show the C-3PO die cast figure that was released along with Vader.





If you want to discover other cool Japanese vintage Star Wars collectables check out my guide over on The Imperial Gunnery Forum

That’s all for now. Thanks for looking, and join us again soon for another Never Mind The Adverts!


 

Never mind the adverts (Pt9)

Welcome to part 9 of TVTA’s series Never Mind The Adverts.

In this edition we focus on James Bond 007 Spy cards.


A collection completed!

Today I finally completed my 007 trading card set! I needed five cards to finish, two of them super-rares. The cards were released in 2008 by GE Fabbri Ltd alongside a fortnightly run of magazines containing facts and info on the James Bond films. The magazines and cards were available to buy in UK newsagents. There were 275 cards to collect, trade and play with (each card has numerical statistics similar to Top Trumps).

A collectors tin was offered with issue 2 in which to store your cards. Mini albums were also available if you wanted to display in a reading format. Other items included a 007 spy pen and a burglar alarm toy. Some of the items were only available for subscribers and were not sold in shops.

Got, got, got, haven’t got, got…

After spending a small fortune and finding that I needed only a dozen or so cards to finish, I stopped buying the cards as I was only turning up doubles. When GE Fabbri discontinued the line I was disappointed to learn that unlike other trading card companies such as Panini, they didn’t offer an end service to buy directly any remaining cards needed. So, it was off to eBay for me to chase the stragglers. At first it was easy, but trying to find the last five I needed for a fair price proved to be difficult. That is until this week, when after a considerable hiatus I decided to hunt down those last stragglers and got lucky!

And here they are…


A small breakdown of what was available either in-store or as a subscriber exclusive…

Issue 1 backing board that was available in newsagents for the series launch. In the foreground is the collectable storage tin that came with issue 2..


Storage tin showing a complete collection of the 275 trading cards. You can also see the double-sided poster standing in the inside of the lid which doubled as a checklist to track and mark off each card.


007 burglar alarm toy, two spy pens, and the wrapper from an opened pack of cards.


Series magazines and cardboard storage box.


The name’s Bond. James Bond. These cards are dedicated to the various actors who played the role.


Villains, allies, Bond girls, gadgets and vehicles!








To sum up, I’m delighted to finally finish this collection. The colourful cards are packed with interesting characters, gadgets and vehicles that span all the Bond films up to Daniel Craig’s first outing. There are plenty of metallic foils to collect along with a small number of super-rare tilting double image cards, making this set hard to complete yet not impossible – even almost ten years later on the secondary market. The magazines are well-produced and the extras are good fun. The collectors tin adds a touch of elegance but needs to be handled with care as the metal is very thin and prone to dents and scratches.

Marks out of ten for the entire set and the collecting experience: a solid 8.5.


That’s all for now. Thanks for looking, and join us again soon for another Never Mind The Adverts!

KerPlunk

Kerplunk was made by Ideal Toys in 1967. Players load the tower with 30 sticks to create a ‘nest’ then place 40 marbles on top of the nest. Players take turns in carefully removing the sticks to prevent any marbles from falling. Fallen marbles accumulate in designated player trays at the base of the tower. The winner is the player with the least amount of fallen marbles at the end of the game.

Ideal Toys catalogue page. 1972.

Ets De Neuter catalogue page. 1995. France.

BIG TRAK

BIG TRAK (US) or Bigtrak (Europe) was a computerised toy vehicle created by Milton Bradley in 1979. This six-wheeled tank-like monster came with attractive decals, a front-mounted blue photon beam headlamp and an integrated programmable keypad that remembered up to 16 commands which it then executed in sequence. The US version was moulded in grey plastic while the European version was white. A companion unit was sold separately – the Big Trak Transporter – a trailer which could be attached to the rear that carried and dumped loads in response to Big Trak’s pre-programmed commands. Big Trak was relaunched in 2010 by Zeon Ltd who produced replicas of the original. 

US. FAO Schwarz catalogue 1980/1981

ZEROIDS – workers of the future

“From the planet Zero come the incredible workers of the future – grabbing, pinching, clawing, carrying, attracting, throwing, pushing, pulling and hauling. From turret to track they are realistically simulated in awesome detail.”

I love how in 1972 the Ideal toy company was using the word “awesome” to describe one of its products – awesome being a word heavily in use today to describe… well… awesome things. Things like toy robots. Things like Zeroids!

Zeroids was a line of battery-operated motorised robots able to propel themselves across surfaces. They appeared on toy shelves in 1967 and underwent a rebrand in the late 70s and more recently in 2016 by the Toyfinity company. The original robot characters in the line are Zobor the Bronze Transporter, Zintar the Silver Explorer, and Zerak the Blue Destroyer.

UK. Ideal catalogue page. 1972.