Tag Archives: TVTA

How to… Help Meatloaf

A brand new vintage post in a series of limited edition baseball and cigarette cards free only with your favourite cereal! Ten fantastic top tips on how to…

N°1 – How to help Meatloaf

1987. US.

N°2 – How to play Frogger at home

1984. US.

N°3 – How to get your free Lone Ranger Western Town

1982. US.

N°4 – How to get your Thrills, Spills and Chills

1979. UK.

N°5 – How to avoid alien abduction with The Thing and Hostess Fruit pies

1981. US.

N°6 – How to gain weight and learn unbeatable fighting power (sparkle edition)

N°7 – How to get Kellogg’s Corn Flakes Dinosaur stuff

1985. UK.

N°8 – How to help Adam Power

1984. US.

N°9 – How to get into the Zorcom Space Ship

1984. US.

N°10 – Wowie, zowie! How to spend Saturday Mornings

1979. US.

Thanks for getting all howie, wowie, zowie with us! Join TVTA again soon for more vintage goodness  🙂 

Dinky Toys & Supertoys 1963 – *commercial break

Dinky Toys tinplate advert. 2013. Editions Atlas.


*TVTA is taking a short break and will return soon with more retro goodness.

We leave you with the following scans which are from a reproduced and licensed 2nd edition 1963 Dinky catalogue, as made available in 2013 by Editions Atlas Collections, France.






Images and Dinky logo copyright of Mattel and Editions Atlas. Scanned by TVTA for information and education purposes only.


 

19th and 20th century lithographs + angels, art and advertising

American Crescent Cycles par Winthrop Ramsdell 1899

La Tournée du Chat Noir par Thoéphile Steinlen. 1896. Tin plate.


Cats That Come Back. At a poster store in Montmartre you spent your final few euros on cards depicting the lithographic advertising styles of the late 19th and early 20th century. You took photos of the outside of the poster store, and had one taken of yourself and your youngest son, a part of you indulging in some late-afternoon fantasy that you were the proprietors of said store. What fun, surrounded by art originally intended to part one from one’s cash – and a hundred years later it’s still doing the same, only selling itself this time around. What a sale, what a fine boutique did those Parisian streets make for you. For it’s easy to get lost in the culture, art and spirit of expression when it surrounds you in all its breath-taking vibrancy. There is a deep yearning. A searching back through history to find a part of yourself you may recognise. Print advertising is consumerism’s cocky high art. A brassy exhibition of wonders. A sly yet alluring gallery that invites you inside. It’s everything you love and loathe in the same moment. You pitch these paper testimonials to commercialism with all the integrity and enthusiasm of a loving archivist. But you are also an artist. Those Paris streets and galleries and windows and walls whispered to your heart. Hell, sometimes they yelled at you, told you they remembered, recalled your angels & fey (born from the snippets and slivers of glossy ads in magazines in case you didn’t know), the exhibitions, the foreign shores, the hours spent holding brushes and conjuring colours. You sold it well, they said. You made an impression. You left a mark. People were happy. Sometimes that’s the least you have to do. From: The Artist and the Four Hats




Job par Alfons Mucha 1896

Job done?

For a bit

Too busy writing

To try and score another hit

It’s a circle you see

A merry go round

You jump on and off at certain points

feet touch the ground

Back up again

Always looking for those special connections


Palooka N° 5


Words, Angel & Fey artwork by the editor.
Colour Angels & Fey scans taken from Palooka issue 5.
Lithograph adverts scanned from commercial postcards and tin plates are shown for illustrative purposes only. No infringement of copyright is intended.
Cat count: we spotted at least 26 images of cats in this blog post. A new TVTA record!

Saturday night at the movies…

Japanese Chirashi movie posters – the Star Wars franchise and a continuing saga!

1982. Return of the Jedi. Teaser.


‘Chirashi’ eh? … he sounds familiar, was he one of Jabba’s henchmen, or an Ewok? 

No. A Chirashi is not a Star Wars character but a small double-sided poster handed out at cinemas in Japan to advertise upcoming movies. And TVTA is absolutely delighted to bring you one of the most comprehensive gatherings of Japanese Star Wars film posters this side of the galaxy! Featuring examples of every Star Wars film made to date and more bad puns than you can shake a Gaderffii stick at… this post is sure to have those nasty Imperials hot on our tails!

The Empire Strikes Back / Return of the Jedi. 1986 Double-feature theatre release.


Three-D-PO and Artoo-Won’t-Do

Among my favourites in my Star Wars Chirashi collection is this Phantom Menace 3D poster. Prior to the Disney purchase of Lucasfilm in 2012, George Lucas had intended to make 3D versions of all six films in the Star Wars Prequel and Original Trilogies. The idea was put on ice in favour of concentrating on ‘rebooting the franchise’ with Episode VII and other new films. Hence, only one of the first six films made it as a 3D cinema release – The Phantom Menace in 2012.

2012. The Phantom Menace 3D.


A long time ago in a gallery far, far away

I need to add something for the 2008 animated release The Clone Wars, and I’m yet to find anything for the infamous Star Wars Holiday Special or the two Ewok films – Caravan of Courage: An Ewok Adventure and Ewoks: Battle for Endor. If any of these turn up I’ll be sure to include them along with the forthcoming releases… with episode XI scheduled for December 2019, a third instalment of the standalone Star Wars Story in 2020, and talk of future new-character trilogies – this gallery is destined to cause a great disturbance in the force!

That’s no moon… it’s TVTA!

As always, thanks for looking 🙂 Click the images below to make bigger.



 

Darda Motor 1986

In 1970 Helmut Darda of Germany invented a tiny interchangeable toy car motor and named it the ‘Darda Motor’. The motor could be inserted into a number of different vehicle types and was ‘wound up’ by rolling it back and forth by hand then releasing it. No batteries were required or electricity to power it. Vehicles could run on almost any surface but were given their own special track system called ‘Darda Tracks’ which were sold individually or in sets. Darda designed the system so that elaborate circuits could be created both horizontally and vertically in seemingly endless configurations limited only by your own imagination and how much track you could afford.

Among the typical vehicles you might expect to see such as road, rally and emergency, Darda produced some fun and unique models like dragsters, beach buggies, a mouse(!), a skateboarder, a rocket, and even a replica of Michael Knight’s KITT from the US television series Knight Rider.

The 1986 German catalogue from which these scans are taken show the classic ‘Darda-Motor’ system (red) as well as the updated ‘Darda-Stop-Motor’ (blue) – a new development at the time which allowed vehicles to be wound up but not activated to go until another vehicle had ‘tapped’ them from the rear. This added a new element to racing as cars could now ‘tag’ each other at different points of a race.

Darda is still made and sold to date, and one of the great things about it is that all current vehicles, motors and tracks can be fully integrated with their vintage counterparts. Add to this that no batteries or electricity is ever required, and that there is a seemingly endless combination of track layouts to be made, and Darda takes quite some beating.


Darda Track Sets


Darda Vehicles


Darda Accessories


Sources:

Darda Motor 1986 catalogue, Germany. Scans made by TVTA.

Website: DardaRacing.com


Thanks for looking 🙂