Lights in the sky – a special report

Seven falling lights formation seen on 10th December 2019 at 05.25.

December 10th. Tuesday. 2019. 05:25. Near the city of Toulon, Var, France.

Diary, I woke up at 05:05 ready to begin a 13 hour shift at work. At 05:25, I went out onto my terrace to fetch my bicycle, where I paused briefly to look up at the sky. It was dark, cold, with patches of stars visible against heavy rain clouds moving in from the north, and with a brisk, north-easterly wind snapping at my face, I steeled myself for what I suspected would be a daunting ride ahead.

Then something caught my attention: in the lower part of the south-eastern sky, I saw seven bright stars in a perfect vertical line aiming down at the horizon. At first I believed it was Orion’s Belt – but the constellation of Orion is not visible in this part of the sky at this hour in December, and normally appears around 22.00 in the evening, plus, there are only three stars that form Orion’s Belt, and I was witnessing seven. What could they be? All at once, the seven stars began moving, descending, and I had to quickly reassess that what I was witnessing were not stars at all… they were moving lights in the sky.

The lights were considerably bigger and brighter than the usual stars you see. I was able to judge this by comparing them to the few stars in the surrounding area – though these were becoming fast swallowed by the clouds sweeping in from the north. What struck me most, however, is that the seven lights in their vertical trajectory were each descending to the horizon in perfect unison and at the same speed. Each light was of equal distance to the next and of the same size – with exception to the highest light which was smaller and at a slightly longer distance to the others.

The meteor addition

I watched those seven lights in their perfect line fall slowly to the horizon, somewhat mesmerised yet with a cool and analytical head. Then, in a moment of added spectacle, a meteor flashed through the centre of the formation and I was filled with wonder. The meteor came and went in a second, a white streak dashing across the sky, and in the next second I found myself making my ‘shooting star wish’ while at the same watching the inexplicable line of lights disappearing below the horizon. Seven lights became six, six became five, four, three… then the clouds passed across the trajectory and obstructed the final three lights, and I was met by darkness.

I could have easily raced back inside, grabbed my phone, raced back out, and made an attempt to video what I was seeing… but… if I had, I would have missed most of the spectacle (which only lasted about a minute, if that). Also, I would have been sure to miss that shooting star! In a way, I’m happy I got to see the spectacle with the naked eye, in real time, and didn’t miss a blink of it. In the absence of photo or video evidence, please accept my humble, hand-drawn effort at the top of the post.

What to do next?Β 

Maybe I should have called Spaceline? Problem is, I don’t think they’ve existed since the late 1980s. I did go to the trouble to making some online research to see if there had been any reported sightings of ‘seven falling lights’ at 05:25 on the tenth of December 2019, Var, France – but found nothing.

This is not the first time I have witnessed lights in the sky, nor do I presume it will be the last. I’ll not declare the various objects I’ve seen to be space craft, saucers, extra-terrestrial observers, military craft, drones, Chinese lanterns, or anything else other than simply ‘lights in the sky’, but my senses are open enough to believe and feel that we, as humans, are not the only intelligent lifeforms to occupy and travel about space.

Dear readers, have you ever witnessed strange lights in the sky? It’s not something I usually talk about, least of all post about, but I thought in this case it would be good to document in words and illustrate what I saw.

I’ll leave you with some classic images of rockets, flying saucers and aliens. Why not? We all want to believe don’t we?

SOUCOUPE A REACTION, friction powered tinplate flying saucer, by SFA, France, 1950s.

MOON ROCKET, battery operated tinplate spacecraft, by Masudaya, Japan, 1960s.

Alien Eye Creature. 1985. US.

Alien Reese’s Pieces. US. 1985.

Tintin watch. Premiere. France. 2018.

Kim believes…

… she made an entire album inspired by strange lights in the sky. Bravo Kim for speaking out and getting creative!

πŸ‘½πŸ‘½πŸ›ΈπŸš€πŸ˜Ž

The X-Files: I Want to Believe. Japanese chirashi.


Thanks for looking to the skies with us πŸ™‚

13:50 – Halloween flash fiction to chill your blood!

Warning: this Halloween blog post contains themes of adult horror which may not be suitable for all audiences.

Happy Halloween dear readers! This year I’m doing something a little different… I recently entered a Halloween flash fiction challenge, with the rules being the story must contain fifty words and be scary. You could enter as many times as you liked, so I’ve selected thirteen of my most gruesome tales which I’m reproducing here for TVTA’s annual Halloween party post!

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Homework assignment: building a better robot

We can do it!

Gerry Anderson Andromedan Warbot. 1979. UK.

Starlog Japan. 1981. Maximilian.

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I’ve been treffing

I like to tref… There, at last, I’ve said it. Truth is, I’m a bit of a trefologist, and I follow trefology because I am interested in learning about life.

If you haven’t yet treffed then I wholeheartedly recommend you do. To find out more about the wonderful world of trefology, get yourself over to fellow WP blog site trefology and follow the fun. You won’t regret it.

An ant story

I.

I wanted to capture ants

Not just any ants, but special ants who wear velvet slippers

So I sprinkled sugar over my terrace to act as bait

And soon a colony of ants in velvet slippers arrived to feast

But then came anteaters in moccasins, who gobbled up the ants

Followed by coyotes in ballet shoes, who ate the anteaters

Followed then by mountain lions in hiking boots, who ate the coyotes

Followed by pandas in clogs from Amsterdam, who ate the mountain lions

By evening my terrace resembled some apocalyptic wasteland of bones and shoes, and I was forced to call the police on the surviving pandas, who were staring at me hungrily

When the police finally came, they ate the pandas, plus their clogs, plus all the other shoes left on my terrace, and then they promptly left, complaining of indigestion

Which is a rookie detective mistake to make – eating such a tough meal as all that while responding to an incident…

So, I dedicate my new book to those hungry police officers: Eats pandas, shoes, and leaves.


II.

If the Very Hungry Caterpillar had been gobbled up by a tree snake at the beginning of its quest to eat, then thousands upon thousands of books might have been spared from the indignity of being sold with holes in their pages.


III.

The following print adverts may become more relevant when you start learning trefology. Only you can discover!


Thank you for wearing shoes and dining with us πŸ˜πŸ•πŸ₯¨πŸ°πŸ­πŸΊπŸ·πŸ΄πŸ₯„πŸ₯’


With thanks to Lynne Truss, Eric Carle, and trefology.

Words by the editor. Images from the collection of TVTA. ‘learn life learn trefology’ flyer by trefology.