Tag Archives: thevintagetoyadvertiser.org

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Welcome to TVTA’s vintage assortment of TMNT merchandise ads showing toys, video games and household goods!

TMNT logo

Named after Italian Renaissance painters Leonardo, Michaelangelo, Donatello, and Rapheal, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are four anthropomorphic friends trained in the art of Ninjutsu (not to be confused with the Teenage Figural Ninja Symbolists Dali, Duchamp, Miro and Ernst – who battled underworld criminals while painting strange landscapes).

The Ninja Turtles originated in a 1984 American comic. An animated TV series came in 1987 followed by further series and feature films. Playmates Toys are responsible for the original toy figures and later Bandai. The turtles also appeared in a number of video game titles as well as promotions for merchandise ranging from dental care to breakfast cereal.

US. Groo. 1989.


US. Groo. 1989.


Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles Nintendo. Denmark. 1991. Image supplied by Jaltesorensen.


Gameboy. Denmark. 1991. Image supplied by Jaltesorensen.


US. Groo. 1990.


Ninja or Hero? Censored in Europe

Due to strict censorship policies in some European countries, the name “Ninja” had to be replaced with “Hero” because of the violent associations of the word “ninja”. This meant that products sold in these countries had to be undergo packaging and advertising changes. By 2003 these censorship policies ceased and our four friends could once again become “ninjas”


Denmark. 1990. Image supplied by Jaltesorenson.


Denmark. 1992. Image supplied by Jaltesorenson.


Denmark. 1990. Image supplied by Jaltesorenson.


Denmark. 1991. Image supplied by Jaltesorenson.


France. Pif Gadget. 1991.

France. Pif Gadget. 1991.


Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.


France. Tortues BD. 1991.

France. Tortues BD. 1991.


US. Nth Man. 1989.


Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles Turtle Power and Turtles to the Rescue sets. Scalextric catalogue, 1989, UK.


Thanks for looking 🙂

This book belongs to…

Various annuals from '90s and 2000s.

The annual, a UK tradition

Each Christmas, my younger brother and I would look forward to receiving our annuals. We never knew exactly which titles we’d receive, but it was a certainty we’d get at least one each, sometimes two. Annuals are hardback comic books released at the end of each year in time for Christmas. They typically feature new and sometimes previously published stories taken from their soft cover counterparts. The covers are made from hard boards and feature a full-page colour image of one or more of the main characters. Inside you will find comic strip stories alongside puzzle and colouring pages, biographies, fact-files, competitions, photos and maybe even a poster or two.


1980s annuals.


The annual is a reasonably cheap and popular gift to give to children, providing hours of reading fun, and is strong and durable thanks to its hard covers. Inside, the first page will usually contain a This book belongs to printed panel in which to write your name. A removable price clip is added to the corner of the next page. This is sometimes removed by parents who wish to keep the cost of the annual a secret. Shhhh!


This 1969 edition of Rupert has not been inscribed or dedicated, nor has the price clip been removed - making this copy attracive to collectors.

This 1969 edition of Rupert has not been inscribed or dedicated, nor has the price clip been removed – making this copy attractive to collectors.


This 1959 edition of Rupert has been inscribed and dedicated. However, The price clip has not been removed.

This 1959 edition of Rupert has been inscribed and dedicated. However, The price clip has not been removed.


This 1977 edition of Rupert has been inscribed, dedicated and had its price clip removed. In addition, the child owner has added his own writing to the page. In 1977 this book would have cost around £1.

This 1977 edition of Rupert has been inscribed, dedicated and had its price clip removed. In addition, the child owner has added his own writing to the page. In 1977 this book would have cost around £1.


A Rupert annual has been released every year since 1936

My Rupert annuals are by far the largest group in my collection which has steadily grown into more than fifty editions. A Rupert annual has been released every year since 1936, including the war years – when hard covers were replaced by soft covers and the inside papers were printed on special ‘war economy’ paper in aid of the war effort.


A few of my Rupert annuals.

Rupert annuals.


Rupert annuals. 1978 left, 1972 right.

Rupert annuals. 1978 left, 1972 right.


 

Collecting annuals

For most collectors an annual is more prized if it’s not had its This book belongs to completed, the price clip reamins intact, and there are no personalised dedications written by family members. For me, I don’t mind a few annuals with these traits, as it adds some extra charm to the book. Other factors that will increase the collectable value of an annual will be colouring and puzzle pages remaining in an uncompleted state, as well as the overall condition of the book such as cover, spine, binding, edgeware, page foxing, etc.


These 1980s Judge Dredd annuals are in excellent condition and have not had their price clips removed.

1980s Judge Dredd annuals.


Thinking back to those past Christmas mornings, it was impossible for my brother and me to mistake those heavy, oblong-shaped presents concealed beneath their wrapping paper as anything other than annuals. Typical annuals given as gifts in our houshold would include popular UK comic titles such as the Beano, Dandy, Topper, Rupert Bear, and Spider-Man. Not forgetting hit TV series titles like Doctor Who, Starsky and Hutch, Space 1999, The Muppet Show, and many others. Annuals based on films, such as Star Wars and Battlestar Galactica were also popular choices.


Spider-Man annuals.


Star Wars annuals: childhood and editions found later.

Star Wars annuals.


1975. Planet of the Apes.

1975. Planet of the Apes.


1981. Raiders of the Lost Ark.

1981. Raiders of the Lost Ark.


 

Welcome Japan to TVTA!

I’m pleased to finally include in TVTA some Japanese adverts. These are scanned from a 1982 edition of graphic design magazine IDEA. The colours and layout are appealing. In fact, the entire magazine is a visual treat and a joy to browse. I scanned a fair few images from my copy, so look out for other features in upcoming posts. In the meantime, hope you enjoy these three.

Japan. Idea. 1981.

Japan. Idea. 1982.

Japan. Idea. 1981.

Japan. Idea. 1982.

Japan. Idea. 1981.

Japan. Idea. 1982.

Think or Swim… The Hunt For Red October 1988 Board Game

USA. Groo 42. 1988.

USA. Groo 42. 1988.

Based on the best-selling novel by Tom Clancy, The Hunt For Red October, this 1988 board game by TSR promised a fast-playing easy-to-learn game, charged with hours of mind-detonating excitement!

Gary Larsen thought he had all the answers… and other retrogaming goodies!

Riddle of the Sphinx

Poor Gary… look at him, a veggie, zonked out. Totalled. This 1983 ad for Atari’s Riddle of the Sphinx tries to convey how hazardous video gaming can be.

USA. The Defenders 1983.

USA. The Defenders 1983.


Freedom! No more wires…  

The Camerica Freedom Stick needed no cumbersome, tangly old wires, and was happy to interact with a number of different console brands.

USA. Groo 47. 1989.

USA. Groo 47. 1989.


Bubble Bobble…. a classic!

 I spent a good many hours tackling this fun game. Also included on this ad are the titles Operation Wolf, Sky Shark, and Renegade.

USA. Groo 47. 1989.

USA. Groo 47. 1989.


Video excitement in the palm of your hand…

I love the artwork on this 1989 ad for Double Dragon from Tiger Electronics.

USA. Groo 57. 1989.

USA. Groo 57. 1989.

Another ad for Double Dragon –

Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.


Parker Brothers… Frogger, Popeye, and Q*bert

Poor Q*bert… in this ad he’s suffered damage to his nose from a removed price sticker – ouch! Shame he doesn’t have his usual little speech bubble above his head with his expletive written inside. Maybe Frogger is the culprit responsible for the price sticker removal… and Popeye is racing off to exact a swift punishment? 🙂

USA. Marvel Alpha Flight. 1984.

USA. Marvel Alpha Flight. 1984.


UK. 2000 AD. 1983.

UK. 2000 AD. 1983.


UK. Eagle. 1983.

UK. Eagle. 1983.


France. Pif Gadget. 1988.

France. Pif Gadget. 1988.


UK. Eagle. 1983.

UK. Eagle. 1983.

 


 

Spalding… presenting Streetball with Rick Barry and DR. J

USA. Marvel Star Wars. 1978.

USA. Marvel Star Wars. 1978.

A.G. Spalding was established in 1876 by Hall of Fame pitcher Albert G. Spalding in Chicago, USA.

This 1978 comic-style ad presents the Spalding Street Ball. It features two great basketball players of their era, Rick Barry and Julius ‘Dr. J’ Erving.

MR. FREEZE… refreshing since 1966

MrFreeze logo 01

First registered as a trademark in 1966 and still in production today, Mr. Freeze products are a well-known and popular brand.


France. Pif Gadget. 1982.

France. Pif Gadget. 1982.


Mr Freeze 'Superfreeze' cartoon strip ad. UK. Eagle. 1984.

Mr Freeze ‘Superfreeze’ cartoon strip ad. UK. Eagle. 1984.


USA. Marvel Star Wars. 1980.

US. Marvel Star Wars. 1980.


 

Vanny… and now you are going on your potty…

1979 French baby doll Vanny, complete with expression of absolute surprise / horror as the little girl prepares to sit her on her pot.

France. Pif Gadget. 1979.

France. Pif Gadget. 1979.