This is it, frantic ones!

With what is possibly the most strangest statement I’ve ever seen on a print advert, I present you, dear frantic ones, with a 1982 Marvel Comics ad for Hungarian Rings – just one of the many puzzles that followed the worldwide popularity trail of Rubik’s Cube. Indeed, Hungarian professor Ernõ Rubik made his own version too; his has 34 balls, the traditional ‘Hungarian’ has 38.

Hungarian Rings Marvel Comics offer. Rampage Magazine N°54. 1982. UK.

Left; Hungarian rings. Right; Rubik’s rings. Pics courtesy of Jaap’s Puzzle Page.

Quote-tastic quotations

Let’s do quotes. It might be interesting to quote from Jaap’s Puzzle Page who did so quote:  It might be interesting to quote from the afterword of the Rubik’s Cubic Compendium [p212] here. It has a picture of the Hungarian rings and the following text by David Singmaster:
Closer to Rubik’s Magic Cube are ‘interlocking cycle’ puzzles where several rings of pieces cross each other. Endre Pap, a Hungarian engineer, invented a flat version with two rings which was marketed as the Hungarian Rings. The idea was not entirely new, as there is an 1893 patent for it.

That patent is US 507,215 by William Churchill, filed on May 28 1891, granted on October 24, 1893.


In other frantic news, O frantic ones …

Role Playing Games

Secret Wars N°14. 1985. UK.

The Young All-Stars N°9. 1988.

Doctor Who

Doctor Who Monthly N°78. 1983.

Doctor Who Monthly N°78. 1983.

Captain Power

The Young All-Stars N°9. 1988. US.

It’s not too late to join the MOTU fan club is it?

Secret Wars N°14. 1985. UK.

Hey dude, this is no cartoon!

Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.

But these are!

US. Iron Man. 1979.

And finally, O fabulous frantic ones, Wonder Woman and Batman are free at last, all in the name of super breakfast cereal favourite Weetabix!

Marvel Superheroes. 1979. UK.


That’s all for now folks. Thanks for getting frantic with us 🙂


No wait …

… just time for one more … 

… it’s rather frantic …

Star Wars Weekly. 1980. UK.


🙂

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

Welcome to TVTA’s vintage assortment of TMNT merchandise ads showing toys, video games and household goods!

TMNT logo

Named after Italian Renaissance painters Leonardo, Michaelangelo, Donatello, and Rapheal, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles are four anthropomorphic friends trained in the art of Ninjutsu (not to be confused with the Teenage Figural Ninja Symbolists Dali, Duchamp, Miro and Ernst – who battled underworld criminals while painting strange landscapes).

The Ninja Turtles originated in a 1984 American comic. An animated TV series came in 1987 followed by further series and feature films. Playmates Toys are responsible for the original toy figures and later Bandai. The turtles also appeared in a number of video game titles as well as promotions for merchandise ranging from dental care to breakfast cereal.

US. Groo. 1989.


US. Groo. 1989.


Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles Nintendo. Denmark. 1991. Image supplied by Jaltesorensen.


Gameboy. Denmark. 1991. Image supplied by Jaltesorensen.


US. Groo. 1990.


Ninja or Hero? Censored in Europe

Due to strict censorship policies in some European countries, the name “Ninja” had to be replaced with “Hero” because of the violent associations of the word “ninja”. This meant that products sold in these countries had to be undergo packaging and advertising changes. By 2003 these censorship policies ceased and our four friends could once again become “ninjas”


Denmark. 1990. Image supplied by Jaltesorenson.


Denmark. 1992. Image supplied by Jaltesorenson.


Denmark. 1990. Image supplied by Jaltesorenson.


Denmark. 1991. Image supplied by Jaltesorenson.


France. Pif Gadget. 1991.

France. Pif Gadget. 1991.


Hawk & Dove N°11. 1990. US.


France. Tortues BD. 1991.

France. Tortues BD. 1991.


US. Nth Man. 1989.


Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles Turtle Power and Turtles to the Rescue sets. Scalextric catalogue, 1989, UK.


Thanks for looking 🙂