Homework assignment: building a better robot

We can do it!

Gerry Anderson Andromedan Warbot. 1979. UK.

Starlog Japan. 1981. Maximilian.

Magic Robot Quiz Game. 1983. UK.

Hulk: Baptism of Fire. John Byrne. 1986. US.

September was pretty cool. It was my birthday, and I was pleased to get Kim Wilde’s last album Here Come The Aliens after seeing Kim and her band live in concert in July. The album is ridiculously addictive, with every single one of its pop/rock/80’s-vibe songs staying in your head long after listening.

Kim Wilde Here Come The Aliens 2018 CD. Artwork by Scarlett Wilde.

I also got The Desaturating Seven CD by Primus, a concept album based on the children’s book The Rainbow Goblins, written by Italian author and artist Ul de Rico. For those who don’t know, Primus is an amazing funk/metal/progressive rock band, recording since 1989, and who composed the original TV theme music to South Park. Primus sucks 🙂

Primus The Desaturating Seven CD

In September I had a story published…

My short story The Shores We Scavenge was published in a print anthology called Secrets in the Water. This is the fourth short I’ve had published to date, as well as a fair bit of poetry. It’s my dream to publish a full length novel… something I’m working on. In the meantime, short stuff is wonderful 🙂

Detective Comics N°1000!

Finally got a copy of the landmark Batman issue, and with a very cool variant cover. Thanks to a good friend in the UK who sent this over.

Detective Comics N° 1000. May 2019. Jim Lee / Scott Williams / Alex Sinclair cover.

Pez love. Love Pez!

Plus two little Smurfs I needed to complete a Kinder Surprise Chocolate Egg collection that I’ve been putting together – look out for an upcoming post all about that! 

Robots…

They can spin!

Shogun Rocket Tops. 1979. Italy.

Robots can attack and compute! 

ATTACKING MARTIAN, battery operated tinplate robot, by Horikawa, Jaman, 1960s. ANSWERGAME, battery operated tinplate robot that executes simple mathematics, by Ichida, Japan, 1960s. From Christie’s South Kensington auction catalogue. 1988.

Robots can talk!

Power Rangers Robot Ranger. 1995. France.

All in all, September was a great month. Thanks for looking (back) with me, and remembering to love your robot  🙂


Poem:

A Quick Digital Lesson

A+ plus a teacher, Teacher-Teacher, back row cheater, front row swot (I’m a girly, girly swot and I don’t care), digital faces preach to reach, upturned calculators, speak and spell, red LCD warnings readable only in reflections, reflections of the mind and soul, hearts chopped up for lunch on a mirror, believing in youth because you’re no different and it hurts just the same and it always will, you, hey you, it’s you because… the song and the dance and the early morning impressions, lessons, torn-open depressions, bleeding hearts and knife-twisting regressions, dreams that violate night after night when you should be sleeping and resting oh my poor dear one, you, you who deserve divine and pure realignment while preparing for your homework assignment, history, history, history, repeat after me: honestly now, if you could go back and change things, would you? Would you take a shiny merit, a prefect badge, 10 points for Slytherin or Gryffindor, detention or lines, the walk of shame to the headmaster’s office – he’ll burn your books and make an example of you in morning assembly in front of the school, idiot, dunce, waster, fool, words so cruel whether said verbally or spelled out on the latest computer or the shiniest screen of the shiniest phone, yes there are Apps for that – they bring you down the moment you soar, are free to use with personalised ads, harvesting away while you study and learn in the digital school where you’re a number not a name, but then… hasn’t that always been the same even when analogue was queen for a day, along with paper and poems and song and word of mouth, and painted cave walls and the primordial grunt? Bell rings. Ring-a-ling-a-ling. Lesson over for today. School’s out. Freedom beckons but only ever of sorts… yet… listen… do you want to know an organic secret straight from the human heart and soul? My digital master, he loves it when I sleep, because he believes he can read my dreams. What he does not know is that I only ever dream in colour.


 

Robo Machines (very mini) mini catalogue

Robo Machines was a transforming vehicle/robot toy line made by the Bandai company in the 1980s.

When I say that this Robo Machines catalogue I recently acquired is not much bigger than a postage stamp I’m not exaggerating! Here it is all in its tiny, little glory. Small is beautiful.

Robo Machines Command Centre Play Set. The top left picture of the transforming vehicle on four legs reminds me of  a very famous vehicle as employed by the Empire in certain Star Wars films!


Thank you for transforming with us 🙂 

Starriors by Tomy


Big thanks to fellow WP blogger Virtuanaut for sharing the image scans from the Starriors Marvel mini-comics series. To view the complete series be sure to visit Virtuanaut’s site.

Starriors was a short-lived line of toy robots made by Tomy in 1984 and 1985. The figures were released with Marvel mini-comics (6 comics in total). Marvel also published a 4-issue comic book series. Some of the Starriors toys were later altered and re-branded for European markets as R.A.T.S (Robot Anti-Terror Squad).


Starriors toy ad. 1984. Image scan by virtuanaut.net

Starriors toy ad. 1984. Image scan by virtuanaut.net



Thanks for looking 🙂

MICRONAUTS

Micronauts was the North American rebranding of the Japanese line of Microman toys released by Takara. Mego handled the license in the US, while in the UK it was the companies Airfix and Lion Rock. Airfix also handled the license for the German market. You can read more Micronauts info here by Ron Pringle.


UK. Star Wars Weekly. 1978.

Advert for the Micronauts comic series. UK. Star Wars Weekly. 1978.


UK. Star Wars Weekly N° 1. 1978.

Airfix Micronauts advert. UK. Star Wars Weekly. 1978.


Airfix Germany. 1978.


Airfix Germany. 1978.