Six Sentence Stories: A Love Like Iron

Art Window, Paris. Photo: TVTA.

I’m linking up with Denise at Girlie On The Edge Blog, where she hosts Six Sentence Stories, and everyone is invited to write a story or poem constructed of six sentences based on a cue word given.

This week’s cue word is Iron.

 

 

Editor’s note: the following is an extract from a larger work in progress, a ghost story, and features two characters making a circular journey. I chose this extract for the Six Sentence Story as it mentions the word ‘iron’ many times, and seemed the perfect fit.

A love like iron

Henry felt the impatient pull of the maze, a magnetism drawing them to the window, reducing them to ferromagnetic powders sent scurrying to the vibrating point of an impossible attraction in an impossible place.

Marling took his arm and led him along, shoulder to shoulder, their cheeks so close they might have easily turned their faces and kissed as two lovers.

And they walked like this for moments in silence, pulled towards the maze, the midday sun finding the iridescence of Marling’s feathers which poked from her crown; medicine woman, animal power.

And the sun’s rays did also cast luminosity upon Henry’s new silk eye patch; pirate-bold, buccaneer.

When finally they arrived at the centre of the maze, the window had already been flung open by their enemy; the relentless pursuer who was waiting for them on the other side.

They entered the world of iron butterflies, iron maidens, iron ladies, iron men, iron giants, iron fists, iron skies and iron ages of a paradise wrought to a refinement good enough for the Eiffel Tower and Paris balconies, where once they haunted these structures as ghosts – flitting through the fretworks without a care in the world, and yet to be burdened by a guilt forged in iron upon their bare shoulders.

Love locks, Paris. Photo: TVTA.

The Eiffel Tower, Paris. Photo: TVTA.


 

Six Sentence Stories: Alice in Wonderland performed by the Fruit Ensemble of Pearsida

Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca art for Anne Sylvestre – Fabulettes 1969.

I’m linking up with Denise at Girlie On The Edge Blog, where she hosts Six Sentence Stories, and everyone is invited to write a story or poem constructed of six sentences based on a cue word given.

This week’s cue word is Passion.

 

 

Alice in Wonderland performed by the Fruit Ensemble of Pearsida 

Once upon a time in a world far beyond our stars, there was a beautiful garden in the Kingdom of Pearsida, inhabited by fruit who lived peacefully together in paradise.

One day, Princess Passion Fruit declared there would be a performance of Alice in Wonderland, and so she built a grand stage in the garden, and from behind the velvet curtains she directed her cast of thespian fruit.

The fine cast included: Alicia Apple in the lead role of Alice (a part she believed she was born to play); the renowned method actor Bartholomew Cavendish Banana as White Rabbit; Spike Rambutan as Cheshire Cat; Marilyn-Mae Mango as March Hare; Bitter Lemon as the Queen of Hearts; and country and western singing star Pow-Pow Pineapples as Mad Hatter.

After many hours of rehearsals the opening night came, and in the audience sat two strangers, travellers from another world – a man and a woman – who watched in silence… goodness, what strange fruit they seemed, everyone thought!

At the end of the play, the strangers left without word, and it was observed by Princess Passion Fruit that her lead actress Alicia was missing, and she cried out to the other fruit: “But where is Alicia Apple, our star?”

“Twas those two strangers in demand of an apple…” said Spike Rambutan, “who snatched poor Alicia and gobbled her up, alas, and there was nought I could do as my prosthetic tail was caught in a dry ice machine, and I fear it is the last we shall ever see of our starlet… may she rest in peace in the great garden in the sky!”


 

In praise of trees

“Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come.”

Chinese Proverb

The How and Why Wonder Book of Trees. Written by Geoffrey Coe. Illustrated by Cynthia Iliff Koehler and Alvin Koehler. Grosset and Dunlap. New York. 1973.

This was one of the books included in my recent free lot of novels, and is not a novel but The How and Why Wonder Book of Trees, originally published in 1964. My copy is from 1973, and I’m featuring selected images illustrated by Cynthia Iliff Koehler and Alvin Koelher.

Enjoy 🌲🌳🍀🍂🍃🌿🌱🌱🌱

Continue reading

Poem – The fisher and the sun

 

Editor’s note: Dear readers, this poem is away on a top secret mission and is currently unavailable to view. It should return later this year. Apologies for any inconvenience. Ford.

 


Words by the editor.