Tag Archives: dolls

Barbie’s ‘Feeling Groovy’ Trash to Treasure 70’s Pad

Just fab! So creative, colourful and groovy. I have an 80s Barbie but this makes me want to go out and find a 70s Barbie now 🙂 Top marks to Starrcreative.ca for more up-cycling Barbie goodness. Please check out Starrcreative’s post for more great photos!

Starrcreative.ca

If you love the home decor show Trading Spaces, consider this an opportunity to decorate a room for someone else, just on a smaller scale! As most of you know, I love to come up with up-cycled Barbie Doll furniture from Thrift Store or garage sale finds, even stuff you might consider throwing away can be transformed into something new. I also like to incorporate great finds from the Dollar Tree for parts and embellishments.

I’m partial to bright colors and the ‘Feeling Groovy’ theme is certainly that! My goal is to share ideas and inspirations, and encourage kids and parents alike to get creative, reuse and have some fun. You might not find the exact same pieces, but you’ll see how easy it is and hopefully get inspired to go on a treasure hunt of your own! There is no sewing and no tools so…

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It’s a doll’s world: clone wars, law suits, and inappropriate names.

Clone after clone after clone. Presenting: The Babs, Randy and Bill wardrobe booklet, 1960s, US.

Babs, Randy and Bill wardrobe booklet, 1960s. Fab-Lu Ltd.

Babs, Randy and Bill dolls were sold by the Fab-Lu Ltd company of New York in the early 1960s. The line was a cheap clone of the popular US Barbie doll brand, and the German Bild Lilli brand that predated both.

Babs’s wardrobe imitated many of Barbie’s costumes, as well as clothing from various Hong Kong cloned Lilli dolls. Babs also mimicked Barbie’s tag of “Teen-Age Fashion Model” by declaring herself as “Queen of Fashion”. Not that Barbie should complain too much, seeing as she herself was a clone of the German Bild Lilli – the original fashion doll.

Randy

Randy was a clone of Barbie’s younger sister, Skipper.

For the British market, Randy underwent a name change to ‘Mary Lou’ due to the English sexualisation of the word randy (meaning ‘to feel sexually aroused’). However, the problems didn’t end there for Randy/Mary Lou. The doll, as seen on her featured pages of the Fab-Lu booklet, was actually a Tammy doll as made by Ideal and ‘borrowed’ for the photoshoot to model Randy’s wardrobe. Fab-Lu tried to get around this by painting a beauty spot on the cheek of the Tammy doll in the hope no one would notice. It failed, and Fab-Lu was later taken to court and sued by Ideal.



Bill

Bill was a clone of Barbie’s boyfriend, Ken.

“Every inch a he-man. Powerful body. Powerful physique.” Check out Bill’s ‘sales pitch’ …

Bill – every inch a he-man?


The Clone War(drobe)s.

Below are the remaining scans of the Babs, Randy and Bill product booklet. It is the only known catalogue to exist for the line to date, and was included in packs of individual dolls and accessories.

Click images to enlarge.


Low, low prices!

Babs dolls and outfits were exceptionally cheap to buy compared to Barbie. Statements such as “fashions made to fit all leading fashion dolls”, and “Other male fashion dolls can and do wear Bill’s extensive wardrobe” were almost a call to arms to buy Babs outfits to put not just on Babs dolls, but on Barbie dolls too.


To find out more about the fascinating history of ‘clone dolls’ – from Lilli to Barbie to Babs and others – check out the excellent article Bild Lilli and the Queens from Outer Space

Until next time, thank you for cloning around with us 🙂

The Barbie, Ken and Midge Wardrobe Booklet – 1962


Here is the second of the three 1962 Barbie in-pack booklets I recently added to my collection. These beautifully illustrated catalogues show the fashion range available back when Barbie was just 3 years old!

Alongside dozens of fashion items for Barbie, Midge and Ken, other gems found inside the catalogues are the Barbie board game, the Dream House and Fashion Shop, knitting patterns, Trousseau Set and the Barbie fan club and magazine.

Below are scans from the blue version wardrobe booklet – Barbie, Ken and Midge. Click images to go bigger.











As always, thanks for looking 🙂

Barbie and Ken catalogue – 1962


I recently picked up three 1962 Barbie in-pack booklets. These beautifully illustrated catalogues show the fashion range available back when Barbie was just 3 years old – amazing to think she’s still going strong today at 60! Alongside dozens of fashion items for Barbie, Midge and Ken, other gems found inside the catalogues are the Barbie board game, the Dream House and Fashion Shop, knitting patterns, Trousseau Set and the Barbie fan club and magazine.

Below are scans from the first booklet – Barbie and Ken – the others to follow another time soon. Click images to go bigger and enjoy 🙂












As always, thanks for looking 🙂

Barbie: alive, sporty and dancing

Presenting: six more Barbie print adverts to add to my collection. The following are all 1970s French ads of a sporting nature. As always thanks for looking 🙂

Barbie tennis and golf. 1970s. France.



Barbie Alive. 1970s. France.


For more superb Barbie print adverts check out my Around The World With Barbie page. 

Barbie 60s 70s Benelux France

France. 1960s.

Benelux. 1970.

Belgium. 1960s.

France. 1973.


Barbie and her friends comic strips. 1965. France.



Thank you for watching Barbie TV(TA) with us 🙂

Baby Face Dolls

“Special super posin’ girl and boy dolls, with feelings you can see!” 

The Baby Face line of dolls was created by Mel Birnkrant in partnership with Kiscom Toys and was licensed in 1990 by the Galoob toy company. Despite only having a short shelf life Baby Face became one of the most popular brands of dolls of its time. Aimed at ages 4 and up, the 13 inch dolls came with removable outfits, diapers, hair accessories, shoes and socks, and were articulated at the head, shoulders, elbows, legs and knees.


“Baby Face dolls – each with a different adorable expression and personality”

One of the highlights of this line for me is the idea of facial expressions married to emotions. This is reflected in the names given to each doll: So Surprised Suzie; So Merry Kerri; So Caring Karen; So Playful Beth. Another highlight is the attempt at diversity with the inclusion of black and Hispanic dolls.

Ten out of ten to the team responsible for creating the photographs in the 1992 Galoob catalogue scans you are seeing in this post. The images are among the best toy photographs I’ve seen – and I’ve seen a fair few over the years. The exquisite photos capture perfectly the quality of the dolls, their outfits and emotions, with great attention paid to the wonderful scene-setting details – making each image a work of art.


 


Baby Face Magic Heart Charms

Special charms with a secret message that appeared when held in a child’s hand, plus love note and ribbon to use as a bracelet or doll necklace.


Bathtub Baby Face

“Super-posin’ new baby dolls that love to play in water!”

These dolls were designed for bathtub play and came with Special Bath Shirts that magically disappeared in water then reappeared when you dried the doll. 



Special Outfits and Fashion Diapers

 


Packaging examples

Images and information taken from the Galoob 1992 trade catalogue as scanned by TVTA. Special thanks to the wonderful site BabyFaceDolls.com for additional information.

As always thanks for looking. This has been TVTA’s 499th post! Look out for post 500 coming soon 🙂

Polly Pocket

It’s a new entry for TVTA as we present some 1995 Polly Pocket scans from French catalogue Ets De Neuter.

Polly Pocket is a line of toy dolls and accessories that became popular during the late 80s and early 90s. The original dolls came in pocket-size cases and were sold by Bluebird toys of the UK and Mattel. Polly Pocket has also appeared in feature films, video games and a web series. It continues to be sold to date.

Thanks for looking 🙂