Homework assignment: building a better robot

We can do it!

Gerry Anderson Andromedan Warbot. 1979. UK.

Starlog Japan. 1981. Maximilian.

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Chapter 29

“Write drunk, edit sober.” Ernest Hemingway.

Of course, many believe that Hemingway never actually said this. It’s more likely that he wouldn’t let anything interfere with his writing, and that includes a hangover. But in the spirit of romance, we surf on those words.

A votre santé!



Annuals adverts

Annuals are hardback anthologies published once a year, usually in time for the Christmas market. Annuals consist of multi comic stories, either new or republished, featuring characters normally seen in their weekly or monthly editions. Puzzle pages, features, profiles, facts and content not always seen in regular format may also feature in annuals. Below is a selection of annual adverts featuring some of the biggest names from TV and comics.


UK. Return Of The Jedi 31. 1984.

Popular annuals of 1984. UK. Return Of The Jedi. 1984.


Star Trek et Warlord annuals. Blue Beetle. 1986. US.


UK. Eagle. 1984.

Advert for the 1985 Battle Action Force annual. UK. Eagle. 1984.


UK. 2000 AD. 44. 1977. Advert for the 1978 edition 2000AD annual.

UK. 2000 AD. 44. 1977. Advert for the 1978 edition 2000 AD annual.


Advert for the 1983 Eagle annual. Eagle. 1982.

Advert for the 1983 Eagle annual. Eagle. 1982.


Advert for the 1984 Eagle annual. Eagle. 1983.

Advert for the 1984 Eagle annual. Eagle. 1983.


 

‘Is not the deprivation of liberty the deepest, severest of injuries?’… the lost poem of Percy Bysshe Shelley

Percy Bysshe Shelley. Portrait by Alfred Clint.

Percy Bysshe Shelley. Portrait by Alfred Clint.

The Bodleian Library has just acquired its 12 millionth book. Written by the romantic poet Percy Bysshe Shelley and printed in 1811 under the alias of “a gentleman of the University of Oxford”, the Poetical Essay on the Existing State of Things is a 172-line poem written in support of the Irish journalist Peter Finnerty who was jailed for libelling a politician. The ‘lost’ poem was discovered in 2006 and has now been acquired by the Bodleian library which has created a full digital copy available free to the public to read. See the link above.

Shelley-Essay-1

What may strike you when you read this poem is how little things have changed since the time of Shelley’s sentiments. The pointlessness and brutality of war, the oppression of the poor at the hands of the rich and priviliged, issues surrounding freedom of the press – themes as relevant today as they were back in the 19th century to Shelley.

I would like to say a big thanks to Shelley! Thank you for speaking up back then. You didn’t have to do this, but you found somewhere inside your spirit the voice to call out injustice and inhumanity. It’s a depressing realisation that little has changed for the better across two-hundred years, but I do draw some comfort that there will always be others like Shelley – and not necessarily just the poets or artists or actors or musician, but those who will continue to call out the corrupt politicians and rulers who consistantly try to prove to us that humanity must always come second to greed.

Note to the ruling class: you with palms greasy from money, or bloody from the sales of arms, many of us can see through your lies, and the petal-thin fabric of all your false charms.

Note to the poets, artists, actors and musicians and anyone with an amplified voice: please continue to speak out against social injustice. You are placed in unique positions, and people will listen.