The Doctor Who Quiz Book of Dinosaurs, 1982

Cover illustration by Geoff Hunt.

We promised you dinosaurs! And here are some – with added Doctor Who time travel stamp of approval!

Presenting, the Doctor Who Quiz Book of Dinosaurs, written by Michael Holt, published by Magnet Books, 1982.

This paperback was aimed at children, and took readers on a journey with the 5th Doctor and his companions – Nyssa and Tegan, as they travelled back and forth through time exploring prehistory. The reader is asked to solve puzzles and answer questions after each adventure is told, aided with black and white illustrations by Rowan Barnes-Murphy.

Big bad bird…

According to the Doctor, the terrifying creature pictured below is a kind of hybrid lizard-vulture-woodpecker called Archaeopteryx (say it ‘Arky-op-terricks).

It couldn’t yet fly, and instead ‘glided’ down from the tops of trees to capture its ground prey, whereupon it would “tear him to shreds with its razor-sharp toothed bill.” The creature was too heavy for flight due to having weak wing muscles and solid, heavy bones – as opposed to modern birds who have hollow bones. Its feathers were used as insulation to protect against the cold climate it inhabited.

TVTA theory: Dinosaurs became extinct not because of an asteroid or disease, but because the Archaeopteryx friggin’ ate them all!

Artisit impression of Archaeopteryx. Image: SPL/BBC.

Koringa, the crocodile-wrestling circus lady! 

In the book, according to Nyssa she once saw a video of a lady croc-wrestler called Koringa, who worked with Bertram Mills’ Circus. The Doctor disputes that Koringa wrestled with crocodiles as they are far too deadly, and rather that it was alligators she wrestled. There follows the theory on how Koringa managed to wrestle such a beast, then a quiz about the differences between alligators and crocodiles. Regarding Koringa, I checked – and she really existed; so Nyssa was right.

Rear cover:

Doctor Who bonus book advert:

Doctor Who Best Sellers. 1984.


That’s all for now…

Thank you for avoiding Archaeopteryx with us 🙂 

The Pandemic and I (12) – movie masks, coffee, #BLM, Avaaz, and a very cool cat!

Don Post Dick Tracy and Gremlins 2 masks. 1990. US.

Greetings, vintage mates… a quick post at the end of my week off work before I return this weekend.

In my last post I wrote that during the French period of déconfinement I wanted to:

  • enjoy a week off, after leave restrictions were finally lifted at my work. Check ✅
  • enjoy a real coffee on an outdoor terrace. Check ✅
  • order material for my blog, now the postal service is back to business. Check ✅

Today’s post features some new mask additions to my print advert collection.

Nice to get some new stuff in at last 🙂

Don Post Gremlins masks. Starlog. 1984.

Don Post TMNT Raphael mask. Starlog. 1990.

Continue reading

Six Sentence Stories: Alice in Wonderland performed by the Fruit Ensemble of Pearsida

Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca art for Anne Sylvestre – Fabulettes 1969.

I’m linking up with Denise at Girlie On The Edge Blog, where she hosts Six Sentence Stories, and everyone is invited to write a story or poem constructed of six sentences based on a cue word given.

This week’s cue word is Passion.

 

 

Alice in Wonderland performed by the Fruit Ensemble of Pearsida 

Once upon a time in a world far beyond our stars, there was a beautiful garden in the Kingdom of Pearsida, inhabited by fruit who lived peacefully together in paradise.

One day, Princess Passion Fruit declared there would be a performance of Alice in Wonderland, and so she built a grand stage in the garden, and from behind the velvet curtains she directed her cast of thespian fruit.

The fine cast included: Alicia Apple in the lead role of Alice (a part she believed she was born to play); the renowned method actor Bartholomew Cavendish Banana as White Rabbit; Spike Rambutan as Cheshire Cat; Marilyn-Mae Mango as March Hare; Bitter Lemon as the Queen of Hearts; and country and western singing star Pow-Pow Pineapples as Mad Hatter.

After many hours of rehearsals the opening night came, and in the audience sat two strangers, travellers from another world – a man and a woman – who watched in silence… goodness, what strange fruit they seemed, everyone thought!

At the end of the play, the strangers left without word, and it was observed by Princess Passion Fruit that her lead actress Alicia was missing, and she cried out to the other fruit: “But where is Alicia Apple, our star?”

“Twas those two strangers in demand of an apple…” said Spike Rambutan, “who snatched poor Alicia and gobbled her up, alas, and there was nought I could do as my prosthetic tail was caught in a dry ice machine, and I fear it is the last we shall ever see of our starlet… may she rest in peace in the great garden in the sky!”


 

The Pandemic and I (11) – an odyssey: living with the virus, plus finding stuff down the back of the sofa and behind the TV…

Odyssey 7 comic shop advert. 1987. UK.

Report – 2 June, 2020

Déconfinement

Today in France, 2 June, many of the remaining restrictions and social distancing measures are being lifted – known as déconfinement.

Here, the same as in many other countries, we will have to learn to live with Covid-19 as we go about our daily business as normally as possible in the most un-normal circumstances.

For many of us it will mean wearing a mask in a situation as mundane as entering a shop (many of us already are). Attending work, social, and study gatherings in limited numbers. Observing stricter hygiene measures than we are used to.

I’m in no rush to head to a restaurant, cinema, beach, park, or a busy shopping mall just yet – but I am looking forward to extending my social interaction with as much protection as I can get (mask, hand gels, respecting distances, avoiding large crowds, washing hands, not touching my face).

For me, it does mean a certain few treats:

Continue reading

In praise of trees

“Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come.”

Chinese Proverb

The How and Why Wonder Book of Trees. Written by Geoffrey Coe. Illustrated by Cynthia Iliff Koehler and Alvin Koehler. Grosset and Dunlap. New York. 1973.

This was one of the books included in my recent free lot of novels, and is not a novel but The How and Why Wonder Book of Trees, originally published in 1964. My copy is from 1973, and I’m featuring selected images illustrated by Cynthia Iliff Koehler and Alvin Koelher.

Enjoy 🌲🌳🍀🍂🍃🌿🌱🌱🌱

Continue reading

To shop or not to shop

Vintage shopping! Check out this charming cardboard diorama shop set, via Wibi over at the Small Wonders blog. For more vintage delights please visit Wibi’s Small Wonders

Wibi Wonders

Do you miss being able to just go into a shop whenever you like and to linger at the vegetable (or any other) display before making your choice? Our shopping habits have surely changed! I realised that I haven’t been to a major Supermarket since lockdown in the UK began – the smaller shop not far from where I live has all I need – and is big enough for physical distancing to work. So this cardboard display/toy is a chance to time-travel to an era when life was different. I hope you enjoy it.

cardboard cutout showing man unloading van in front of warehouse.

Cardboard cutout of fictional Supermarket showing Coffee, Bakery and Dairy Products displays.
While I have found a few ‘B & H Super Markets’ I think I can safely assume that this one was invented – it was not a promotional toy.

illustration of fictional Super market showing freezer packed with food and frozen vegetable

illustration of vegetable and fruit boxes such as apples and carrots

cardboard cut-outs of 2 supermarket displays: one of tins, one of ketchup bottles. Plus cardboard cut-out of man weighing item.

Two cardboard cut-outs: one showing girl and shopping trolley, the other a boy with a paper bag filled with vegetables.

The inclusion of the shopping cart and the dress of the lady visiting the café makes me fairly sure that the whole set is from the…

View original post 181 more words

More random book cover designs, and a spotlight on British Salvationist illustrator Jim Moss

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. 1999 Harper Collins. Cover by J.R.R. Tolkien.

We have you covered… again!  (See part one here)

Today’s book post features design covers and illustrations published between the 1920s and 2010s, courtesy of a generous donation of old books to TVTA!

What happened was this… an English teacher working in France was moving home and job, and before leaving she decided to give away a number of her old books. Finally, after a Pandemic-lockdown-observed-meeting outside the local park gates, two bags of wonderful books were handed over for the reading and scanning pleasure of those inside TVTA Towers – cue happiness 🙂

Some of the titles will be instantly recognisable, others obscure, some have been adapted for stage, film or television, but all are equal here in having interesting covers to bind their tales.

Enjoy your donated book!

1920 William Heinemann.

Continue reading