About The Vintage Toy Advertiser

TVTA’s mission is to digitally showcase vintage print advertising and catalogue images which have helped shape pop culture across the years: from toys, to film, to music, to comics, video games, fashion, food, drink, and much more! TVTA began life in 2010 as a French blog documenting French toy ads. In 2011 the site moved to its current WordPress home and expanded to include international adverts, catalogues and posters that went beyond toys. Today the site is an ad-free, non-revenue platform aiming to serve as an excellent digital archive and resource. TVTA loves: the 1970s, 80s & 90s; comics; video games; music; movies; art & design; writing; photography; fashion; and of course... toys! Please feel free to join our growing community of pop culture lovers and help spread the fun!

Six Sentence Stories: Alice in Wonderland performed by the Fruit Ensemble of Pearsida

Agathe Tran Quang My and Biosca art for Anne Sylvestre – Fabulettes 1969.

I’m linking up with Denise at Girlie On The Edge Blog, where she hosts Six Sentence Stories, and everyone is invited to write a story or poem constructed of six sentences based on a cue word given.

This week’s cue word is Passion.

 

 

Alice in Wonderland performed by the Fruit Ensemble of Pearsida 

Once upon a time in a world far beyond our stars, there was a beautiful garden in the Kingdom of Pearsida, inhabited by fruit who lived peacefully together in paradise.

One day, Princess Passion Fruit declared there would be a performance of Alice in Wonderland, and so she built a grand stage in the garden, and from behind the velvet curtains she directed her cast of thespian fruit.

The fine cast included: Alicia Apple in the lead role of Alice (a part she believed she was born to play); the renowned method actor Bartholomew Cavendish Banana as White Rabbit; Spike Rambutan as Cheshire Cat; Marilyn-Mae Mango as March Hare; Bitter Lemon as the Queen of Hearts; and country and western singing star Pow-Pow Pineapples as Mad Hatter.

After many hours of rehearsals the opening night came, and in the audience sat two strangers, travellers from another world – a man and a woman – who watched in silence… goodness, what strange fruit they seemed, everyone thought!

At the end of the play, the strangers left without word, and it was observed by Princess Passion Fruit that her lead actress Alicia was missing, and she cried out to the other fruit: “But where is Alicia Apple, our star?”

“Twas those two strangers in demand of an apple…” said Spike Rambutan, “who snatched poor Alicia and gobbled her up, alas, and there was nought I could do as my prosthetic tail was caught in a dry ice machine, and I fear it is the last we shall ever see of our starlet… may she rest in peace in the great garden in the sky!”


 

The Pandemic and I (11) – an odyssey: living with the virus, plus finding stuff down the back of the sofa and behind the TV…

Odyssey 7 comic shop advert. 1987. UK.

Report – 2 June, 2020

Déconfinement

Today in France, 2 June, many of the remaining restrictions and social distancing measures are being lifted – known as déconfinement.

Here, the same as in many other countries, we will have to learn to live with Covid-19 as we go about our daily business as normally as possible in the most un-normal circumstances.

For many of us it will mean wearing a mask in a situation as mundane as entering a shop (many of us already are). Attending work, social, and study gatherings in limited numbers. Observing stricter hygiene measures than we are used to.

I’m in no rush to head to a restaurant, cinema, beach, park, or a busy shopping mall just yet – but I am looking forward to extending my social interaction with as much protection as I can get (mask, hand gels, respecting distances, avoiding large crowds, washing hands, not touching my face).

For me, it does mean a certain few treats:

Continue reading

In praise of trees

“Keep a green tree in your heart and perhaps a singing bird will come.”

Chinese Proverb

The How and Why Wonder Book of Trees. Written by Geoffrey Coe. Illustrated by Cynthia Iliff Koehler and Alvin Koehler. Grosset and Dunlap. New York. 1973.

This was one of the books included in my recent free lot of novels, and is not a novel but The How and Why Wonder Book of Trees, originally published in 1964. My copy is from 1973, and I’m featuring selected images illustrated by Cynthia Iliff Koehler and Alvin Koelher.

Enjoy 🌲🌳🍀🍂🍃🌿🌱🌱🌱

Continue reading

To shop or not to shop

Vintage shopping! Check out this charming cardboard diorama shop set, via Wibi over at the Small Wonders blog. For more vintage delights please visit Wibi’s Small Wonders

Wibi Wonders

Do you miss being able to just go into a shop whenever you like and to linger at the vegetable (or any other) display before making your choice? Our shopping habits have surely changed! I realised that I haven’t been to a major Supermarket since lockdown in the UK began – the smaller shop not far from where I live has all I need – and is big enough for physical distancing to work. So this cardboard display/toy is a chance to time-travel to an era when life was different. I hope you enjoy it.

cardboard cutout showing man unloading van in front of warehouse.

Cardboard cutout of fictional Supermarket showing Coffee, Bakery and Dairy Products displays.
While I have found a few ‘B & H Super Markets’ I think I can safely assume that this one was invented – it was not a promotional toy.

illustration of fictional Super market showing freezer packed with food and frozen vegetable

illustration of vegetable and fruit boxes such as apples and carrots

cardboard cut-outs of 2 supermarket displays: one of tins, one of ketchup bottles. Plus cardboard cut-out of man weighing item.

Two cardboard cut-outs: one showing girl and shopping trolley, the other a boy with a paper bag filled with vegetables.

The inclusion of the shopping cart and the dress of the lady visiting the café makes me fairly sure that the whole set is from the…

View original post 181 more words

More random book cover designs, and a spotlight on British Salvationist illustrator Jim Moss

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. 1999 Harper Collins. Cover by J.R.R. Tolkien.

We have you covered… again!  (See part one here)

Today’s book post features design covers and illustrations published between the 1920s and 2010s, courtesy of a generous donation of old books to TVTA!

What happened was this… an English teacher working in France was moving home and job, and before leaving she decided to give away a number of her old books. Finally, after a Pandemic-lockdown-observed-meeting outside the local park gates, two bags of wonderful books were handed over for the reading and scanning pleasure of those inside TVTA Towers – cue happiness 🙂

Some of the titles will be instantly recognisable, others obscure, some have been adapted for stage, film or television, but all are equal here in having interesting covers to bind their tales.

Enjoy your donated book!

1920 William Heinemann.

Continue reading

Six Sentence Stories: The hen that came down a beanstalk

Jack and the Beanstalk. Illustration by Eric Winter, 1965, Ladybird Books.

I’m linking up with Denise at Girlie On The Edge Blog, where she hosts Six Sentence Stories, and everyone is invited to write a story or poem constructed of six sentences based on a cue word given.

This week’s cue word is Eternal.

 

 

The hen that came down a beanstalk

Jack is dead, oh, eternal be his memory –

Yet I have no time for his eulogy, as I clamber down this bristling stalk,

Over leaves as long as surfboards, over beans as big as basketballs,

Down, down, to meet my new horizon which shimmers with a hope

That I may return to a coop of my own.

 

Down I climb to claim this liberty, but – curses – that ogre is after me;

Bigger than me, bolder, brasher, brawnier, broiling with anger and betrayal and

Bloodlust!

 

“Get back ‘ere!” the ogre screams.

 

Frightened, frantic, faster and faster down the beanstalk I scarper,

While above me the ogre booms down oaths of murderous revenge:

The rain is his sweat, the wind is his breath, thunderbolts his words,

Flies and mosquitoes his crumbs of bread…

Broken from the bones of Englishmen like Jack.

 

Down, down, about to touch the ground, and there at the foot of the beanstalk stands

Jack’s mother – her each axe-chop a strike for Jack (oh, eternal be his memory) …

Chop… chop… chop… and at last the beanstalk topples, and with it the ogre

Who breaks his neck as easily as once he broke his bread.

 

Jack’s mother, she scoops me up and cradles me with more love

Than I had ever thought possible could exist; and for this, tomorrow,

After resting, and mending my wings and bruised beak,

I will lay for her a golden egg, as she puts on black robes for the eternal memory

Of her son, brave Jack, who set me free from a castle in the sky.


 

2000 AD Progs, Star Pin-Ups, Poster Covers, and thrill-power galore!

Mutie and the Beast star pin up. 2000 AD Sci Fi Special. 1987.

TVTA is pleased to present an utterly thrill-tastic selection of 1980s and 90s Prog covers, Star Pin-Ups, Poster Covers, and more from British comic publication 2000 AD – featuring art by Carlos Ezquerra, Kevin O’Neil, Ron Smith, Massimo Belardinelli, Dave Gibbons, Jim McCarthy, Cliff Robinson, Brett Ewins, John Ridgway, Henry Flint, and Loaf.

Rejoice, brothers (and sisters) of Death!

Many readers of 2000 AD will know about Judge Death and the Four Dark Judges…

TVTA.

Brian Bolland.

But how about the Sisters of Death: Nausea and Phobia?

Below panels from Judge Dredd: The Dead Man. The Sisters of Death – Nausea and Phobia. Art by John Ridgway.

Feeling ssssick yet? If Nausea and Phobia are a bit too much for you, there’s always mutant vampire bounty hunter Durham Red…

Durham Red. 2000 AD Sci Fi Special 1989. Artist credited as SW?

Continue reading