Lights in the sky – a special report

Seven falling lights formation seen on 10th December 2019 at 05.25.

December 10th. Tuesday. 2019. 05:25. Near the city of Toulon, Var, France.

Diary, I woke up at 05:05 ready to begin a 13 hour shift at work. At 05:25, I went out onto my terrace to fetch my bicycle, where I paused briefly to look up at the sky. It was dark, cold, with patches of stars visible against heavy rain clouds moving in from the north, and with a brisk, north-easterly wind snapping at my face, I steeled myself for what I suspected would be a daunting ride ahead.

Then something caught my attention: in the lower part of the south-eastern sky, I saw seven bright stars in a perfect vertical line aiming down at the horizon. At first I believed it was Orion’s Belt – but the constellation of Orion is not visible in this part of the sky at this hour in December, and normally appears around 22.00 in the evening, plus, there are only three stars that form Orion’s Belt, and I was witnessing seven.

What could they be? All at once, the seven stars began moving, descending, and I had to quickly reassess that what I was witnessing were not stars at all… they were moving lights in the sky!

The lights were considerably bigger and brighter than the usual stars you see. I was able to judge this by comparing them to the few stars in the surrounding area – though these were becoming fast swallowed by the clouds sweeping in from the north. What struck me most, however, is that the seven lights in their vertical trajectory were each descending to the horizon in perfect unison and at the same speed. Each light was of equal distance to the next and of the same size – with exception to the highest light which was smaller and at a slightly longer distance to the others.

The meteor addition

I watched those seven lights in their perfect line fall slowly to the horizon, somewhat mesmerised yet with a cool and analytical head. Then, in a moment of added spectacle, a meteor flashed through the centre of the formation and I was filled with wonder. The meteor came and went in a second, a white streak dashing across the sky, and in the next second I found myself making my ‘shooting star wish’ while at the same watching the inexplicable line of lights disappearing below the horizon. Seven lights became six, six became five, four, three… then the clouds passed across the trajectory and obstructed the final three lights, and I was met by darkness.

I could have easily raced back inside, grabbed my phone, raced back out, and made an attempt to video what I was seeing… but… if I had, I would have missed most of the spectacle (which only lasted about a minute, if that). Also, I would have been sure to miss that shooting star! In a way, I’m happy I got to see the spectacle with the naked eye, in real time, and didn’t miss a blink of it. In the absence of photo or video evidence, please accept my humble, hand-drawn effort at the top of the post.

What to do next?ย 

Maybe I should have called Spaceline? Problem is, I don’t think they’ve existed since the late 1980s. I did go to the trouble to making some online research to see if there had been any reported sightings of ‘seven falling lights’ at 05:25 on the tenth of December 2019, Var, France – but found nothing.

This is not the first time I have witnessed lights in the sky, nor do I presume it will be the last. I’ll not declare the various objects I’ve seen to be space craft, saucers, extra-terrestrial observers, military craft, drones, Chinese lanterns, or anything else other than simply ‘lights in the sky’, but my senses are open enough to believe and feel that we, as humans, are not the only intelligent lifeforms to occupy and travel about space.

Dear readers, have you ever witnessed strange lights in the sky? It’s not something I usually talk about, least of all post about, but I thought in this case it would be good to document in words and illustrate what I saw.

I’ll leave you with some classic images of rockets, flying saucers and aliens. Why not? We all want to believe don’t we?

SOUCOUPE A REACTION, friction powered tinplate flying saucer, by SFA, France, 1950s.

MOON ROCKET, battery operated tinplate spacecraft, by Masudaya, Japan, 1960s.

Alien Eye Creature. 1985. US.

Alien Reese’s Pieces. US. 1985.

Tintin watch. Premiere. France. 2018.

Kim believes…

… she made an entire album inspired by strange lights in the sky. Bravo Kim for speaking out and getting creative!

๐Ÿ‘ฝ๐Ÿ‘ฝ๐Ÿ›ธ๐Ÿš€๐Ÿ˜Ž

The X-Files: I Want to Believe. Japanese chirashi.


Thanks for looking to the skies with us ๐Ÿ™‚

23 thoughts on “Lights in the sky – a special report

  1. Hi TVTA, sorry but that was no meteor…er it was me! I was delivering some presents in my Jedi Interceptor! Unfortunately I didn’t align the power converters just right and I kinda set fire to the rear of my ship…a bit embarrassing to be honest ;D I imagine I looked a bit like a shooting star from the ground.
    Oh and those lights falling down in unison? Those were a couple of lightsabers I dropped off including the one for Scully that she has in your chirashi.

    Liked by 2 people

    • LOL! Brilliant answer to my sighting, FT, and at last the puzzle has been solved ๐Ÿ™‚ However, my sighting has been registered with NASA who is monitoring post replies here, so don’t be surprised if they turn up later this evening at yours wearing white boiler suits and space helmets (after 10 PM voting closing times of course) to drape a giant black cloth over your tower block and confiscate all your space ships and sabers as ‘evidence’ ๐Ÿ™‚
      PS – I was wondering if you would notice Dana’s flashlight looks suspiciously like a saber!!! Good eye my friend!

      Liked by 2 people

      • Thanks for dobbing me in! All I need is NASA knockin’ on my door! No worries though.
        I always thought the torches in the X-Files were like lightsabers – I had never seen beams of light like that on a TV show before.
        Now I had best activate my cloaking device…and wave my hand saying, “There are no Jedi here….move along….For can go about his business he is not the alien you are looking for”…

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Do-do-do-doo, do-do-do-doo! I remember as a child seeing a red sparkly light in the sky; it turned out to be a flare… or, at least, that was my parents’ explanation. But for that moment I was convinced! Love that Tintin watch.

    Liked by 1 person

    • A flare – that’s an interesting explanation. There are so many possibilities as to what is going on in the sky… from human science, weather, hobby and military technology – to the stuff beyond our wildest dreams! It’s a fascinating area of interest, with the ultimate proof of life beyond Earth still eluding us as far as we know.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. How cool is that!!! I had a UFO sighting in 1982 – didn’t believe in them prior but would never deny their existence now. The skies are full of mysteries, how wonderful that you saw something unusual and special.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you for sharing you had an experience too. 1982? My first was in 1983, and what an amazing sight for the young me. I witnessed it with a friend, and also a passerby out walking his dog, so I know it was something special by their shocked reactions which were equal to mine, and it was good that there were three of us there because it consolidated what we each saw.
      You are very lucky to have had an unusual sighting yourself! Keep watching the skies, you might yet see other mysteries!

      Like

  4. Thatโ€™s quite something! I donโ€™t think Iโ€™ve ever seen anything other than plane lights, Iโ€™m afraid… but I donโ€™t doubt for one second those skies are a playground for something or someone else.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Great story! Watch out for those men in black, and I’m not talking about Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones–who is still appearing in coffee adverts over here in Japan, btw– or Chris Hemsworth. Me and my daughter saw a light moving around in the sky over Yonago a few years back. It was the weird, random, back-and-forth way it was moving that caught our attention. I want to believe, too! That’s all I have to say about that.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for sharing your experience! And brilliant you saw it with your daughter, as seeing with others consolidates the experience. It’s enough really I guess that folk like you and I and others have had sightings, but when you factor in all the eye-witness statements given by respected military personnel, aviation officers, police and the like… there really must be something out there quite special.

      Like

  6. Years ago, I was in the Andes. We were hiking from Km. 99(as measured by the railway) to Machu Picchu. We spent 5 nights sleeping outdoors. I was fascinated by the night sky, as it was so different from the northern sky. I observed the Southern Cross each night. If I had been in Canada, it would have been the Big Dipper. One night there were 4 shooting stars, all in tandem. We watched until they were gone. It took less than a minute, I believe!

    Liked by 1 person

    • That sounds such a wonderful experience in the Andes. You can’t beat seeing the sky when you’re already so high up! My best sky watching time was at all night jam session I had with 12 fellow musicians on a mountain in France. One of the guitarists was the chief park ranger there, and he’d converted the ranger guest house into a music studio. A few times a year he’s invited friends up for a jam. About 2 AM, we all went outside to watch the sky, and being so high up with zero light pollution it was an amazing spectacle to see so many different stars.

      Like

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